A molecular phylogeny of the genus Apis suggests that the Giant Honey Bee of the Philippines, A. breviligula Maa, and the Plains Honey Bee of southern India, A. indica Fabricius, are valid species

Authors

  • NATHAN LO,

    1. Behaviour and Genetics of Social Insects Laboratory, School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
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  • ROSALYN S. GLOAG,

    1. Behaviour and Genetics of Social Insects Laboratory, School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
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  • DENIS L. ANDERSON,

    1. CSIRO Division of Entomology, Black Mountain Laboratory, Canberra, Australia
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  • BENJAMIN P. OLDROYD

    Corresponding author
    1. Behaviour and Genetics of Social Insects Laboratory, School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
    • Benjamin P. Oldroyd, Behaviour and Genetics of Social Insects Laboratory, School of Biological Sciences A12, University of Sydney, NSW 2600, Australia. E-mail: boldroyd@usyd.edu.au

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  • Unpublished for the purposes of zoological nomenclature (Art. 8.2, ICZN)

Abstract

Two new taxa have been added to the existing molecular phylogenies of the genus Apis. The new phylogeny supports the accepted phylogenetic relationships of {dwarf honey bees [giant honey bees (cavity-nesting honey bees)]}. Based on Bayesian and maximum parsimony trees, our analysis supports recognition of Apis indica, the Plains Honey Bee of south India, as a separate species from A. cerana. Our analysis also supports recognition of the Giant Philippines Honey Bee, A. breviligula, as a separate species from A. dorsata.

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