Characterization of seed-specific benzoyloxyglucosinolate mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana

Authors

  • Daniel J. Kliebenstein,

    1. Department of Plant Sciences, University of California-Davis, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
    • DJK and JCD contributed equally to this work and should be considered co-first authors.

  • John C. D’Auria,

    1. Department of Biochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Hans-Knoll Strasse 8, D-07745 Jena, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
    • DJK and JCD contributed equally to this work and should be considered co-first authors.

  • Aditi S. Behere,

    1. Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, Tower Road, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Present address: Codon Devices, One Kendall Square, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.

  • Jae Hak Kim,

    1. Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, Tower Road, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Kevin L. Gunderson,

    1. Illumina, Inc. 9885 Towne Centre Dr., San Diego, CA 92121, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • John N. Breen,

    1. Cereon Genomics, 45 Sidney Street, Cambridge MA 02139, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Present address: Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI 48824-1319, USA.

  • Grace Lee,

    1. Illumina, Inc. 9885 Towne Centre Dr., San Diego, CA 92121, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Present address: Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118, USA.

  • Jonathan Gershenzon,

    1. Department of Biochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Hans-Knoll Strasse 8, D-07745 Jena, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Robert L. Last,

    1. Cereon Genomics, 45 Sidney Street, Cambridge MA 02139, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
    • §

      Present address: Johnson & Johnson company, 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

  • Georg Jander

    1. Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, Tower Road, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    Search for more papers by this author

(fax +1 607 254 2958; e-mail gj32@cornell.edu).

Summary

Glucosinolates are secondary metabolites involved in pathogen and insect defense of cruciferous plants. Although seeds and vegetative tissue often have very different glucosinolate profiles, few genetic factors that determine seed glucosinolate accumulation have been identified. An HPLC-based screen of 5500 mutagenized Arabidopsis thaliana lines produced 33 glucosinolate mutants, of which 21 have seed-specific changes. Five of these mutant lines, representing three genetic loci, are compromised in the biosynthesis of benzoyloxyglucosinolates, which are only found in seeds and young seedlings of A. thaliana. Genetic mapping and analysis of T-DNA insertions in candidate genes identified BZO1 (At1g65880), which encodes an enzyme with benzoyl-CoA ligase activity, as being required for the accumulation of benzoyloxyglucosinolates. Long-chain aliphatic glucosinolates are elevated in bzo1 mutants, suggesting substrate competition for the common short-chain aliphatic glucosinolate precursors. Whereas bzo1 mutations have seed-specific effects on benzoyloxyglucosinolate accumulation, the relative abundance of 3-benzoyloxypropyl- and 4-benzoyloxybutylglucosinolates depends on the maternal genotype.

Ancillary