Arabidopsis – a powerful model system for plant cell wall research

Authors

  • Aaron H. Liepman,

    Corresponding author
    1. Biology Department, Eastern Michigan University, 316 Mark Jefferson Building, Ypsilanti, MI 48197, USA
      For correspondence (fax +1 734 487 9235; e-mail aliepman@emich.edu).
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  • Raymond Wightman,

    1. Faculty of Life Science, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 6AY, UK
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  • Naomi Geshi,

    1. VKR Research Centre, Department of Plant Biology and Biotechnology, University of Copenhagen, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark
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  • Simon R. Turner,

    1. Faculty of Life Science, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 6AY, UK
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  • Henrik Vibe Scheller

    1. Feedstocks Division, Joint BioEnergy Institute, 5885 Hollis Street, Emeryville, CA 94608, USA
    2. Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
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For correspondence (fax +1 734 487 9235; e-mail aliepman@emich.edu).

Summary

Plant cell walls are composites of various carbohydrates, proteins and other compounds. Cell walls provide plants with strength and protection, and also represent the most abundant source of renewable biomass. Despite the importance of plant cell walls, comparatively little is known about the identities of genes and functions of proteins involved in their biosynthesis. The model plant Arabidopsis and the availability of its genome sequence have been invaluable for the identification and functional characterization of genes encoding enzymes involved in plant cell-wall biosynthesis. This review covers recent progress in the identification and characterization of genes encoding proteins involved in the biosynthesis of Arabidopsis cell-wall polysaccharides and arabinogalactan proteins. These studies have improved our understanding of both the mechanisms of cell-wall biosynthesis and the functions of various cell-wall polymers, and have highlighted areas where further research is needed.

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