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An NAC transcription factor orchestrates multiple features of cell wall development in Medicago truncatula

Authors

  • Qiao Zhao,

    1. Plant Biology Division, Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, 2510 Sam Noble Parkway, Ardmore, OK 73401, USA
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  • Lina Gallego-Giraldo,

    1. Plant Biology Division, Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, 2510 Sam Noble Parkway, Ardmore, OK 73401, USA
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  • Huanzhong Wang,

    1. Plant Biology Division, Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, 2510 Sam Noble Parkway, Ardmore, OK 73401, USA
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  • Yining Zeng,

    1. Chemical & Biosciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401, USA
    2. Bioenergy Sciences Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, TN, USA
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  • Shi-You Ding,

    1. Chemical & Biosciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401, USA
    2. Bioenergy Sciences Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, TN, USA
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  • Fang Chen,

    1. Plant Biology Division, Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, 2510 Sam Noble Parkway, Ardmore, OK 73401, USA
    2. Bioenergy Sciences Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, TN, USA
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  • Richard A. Dixon

    Corresponding author
    1. Plant Biology Division, Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, 2510 Sam Noble Parkway, Ardmore, OK 73401, USA
    2. Bioenergy Sciences Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, TN, USA
      *For correspondence (fax +1 580 224 6692; e-mail radixon@noble.org).
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*For correspondence (fax +1 580 224 6692; e-mail radixon@noble.org).

Summary

To identify genes controlling secondary cell wall biosynthesis in the model legume Medicago truncatula, we screened a Tnt1 retrotransposon insertion mutant population for plants with altered patterns of lignin autofluorescence. From more than 9000 R1 plants screened, four independent lines were identified with a total lack of lignin in the interfascicular region. The mutants also showed loss of lignin in phloem fibers, reduced lignin in vascular elements, failure in anther dehiscence and absence of phenolic autofluorescence in stomatal guard cell walls. Microarray and PCR analyses confirmed that the mutations were caused by the insertion of Tnt1 in a gene annotated as encoding a NAM (no apical meristem)-like protein (here designated Medicago truncatula NAC SECONDARY WALL THICKENING PROMOTING FACTOR 1, MtNST1). MtNST1 is the only family member in Medicago, but has three homologs (AtNST1–AtNST3) in Arabidopsis thaliana, which function in different combinations to control cell wall composition in stems and anthers. Loss of MtNST1 function resulted in reduced lignin content, associated with reduced expression of most lignin biosynthetic genes, and a smaller reduction in cell wall polysaccharide content, associated with reduced expression of putative cellulose and hemicellulose biosynthetic genes. Acid pre-treatment and cellulase digestion released significantly more sugars from cell walls of nst1 mutants compared with the wild type. We discuss the implications of these findings for the development of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) as a dedicated bioenergy crop.

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