Prevalence of enzootic simian viruses among urban performance monkeys in Indonesia

Authors


Authors
Lisa Jones-Engel (corresponding author), National Primate Research Center, University of Washington Seattle, WA, USA. Tel +1 206 221 6843; Fax: +1 206 543 7959; E-mail: jonesengel@bart.rprc.washington.edu
Michael A. Schillaci, Department of Social Sciences, University of Toronto at Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Scarborough, Ontario, Canada M1C 1A4. Tel.: +1 416 287 7328; Fax: +1 416 287 7283; E-mail: schillaci@utsc.utoronto.ca
Gregory A. Engel, Swedish/Providence Family Practice Residency, Seattle, WA, USA. Tel.: +1 206 320 2235; Fax: +1 206 543 7959; E-mail: Gregory.Engel@swedish.org
Yasmina Paramastri and Entang Iskandar, Primate Research Center, Bogor Agricultural University, Bogor, Indonesia. Tel.: +62 251 313637; Fax: +62 251 360712; E-mail: yparamas@indosat.net.id, bioprima@indo.net.id
Brenda Wilson and Jonathan S. Allan, Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, San Antonio, TX, USA. Tel.: +1 210 258 9475; Fax: +1 210 610 3332; E-mail: bwilson@icarus.sfbr.org, jallan@icarus.sfbr.org
Randall C. Kyes, Robin Watanabe and Richard Grant, National Primate Research Center, University of Washington Seattle, WA, USA. Tel.: +1 206 543 3025; Fax: +1 206 543 7959; E-mail: rkyes@u.washington.edu; robinw@bart.rprc.washington.edu; rgrant@bart.rprc.washington.edu

Summary

Animal reservoirs are the most important sources of emerging infectious diseases that threaten human populations. Global travel and tourism bring ever-increasing numbers of humans into contact with animals, increasing the likelihood of cross species transmission of infectious agents. Non-human primates come into contact with humans in a variety of contexts and may harbor infectious agents with zoonotic potential. We investigated the prevalence of infection with enzootic simian viruses among 20 urban performance monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) in Jakarta, Indonesia. This report documents for the first time evidence of infection with four simian viruses in urban performance monkeys. Simian foamy virus was detected by PCR in 52.9% of the macaques. Antibodies to simian retrovirus were detected in 10.5% of the macaques. Antibodies to Cercopithecine Herpesvirus 1, were detected in 5.3% of the macaques. Similarly, antibodies to simian T-cell lymphotropic virus were detected in 5.3% of the macaques. No evidence of infection with simian immunodeficiency virus was detected in these macaques. These results suggest that urban performance monkeys are a reservoir for enzootic simian viruses known to be capable of infecting humans.

Ancillary