Generalized calcinosis cutis associated with probable leptospirosis in a dog

Authors

  • JOHN S. MUNDAY,

    Corresponding author
    1. New Zealand Veterinary Pathology Ltd. and Department of Pathobiology, Institute of Veterinary and Animal Biological Sciences, Massey University, Palmerston North,
      J. S. Munday, Department of Pathobiology, Institute of Veterinary and Animal Biological Sciences, Massey University, Private Bag 11 222, Palmerston North, New Zealand. Tel.: 006463569099; Fax: 006463505636; E-mail: jmunday@massey.ac.nz
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  • DAVID J. BERGEN,

    1. Northern Waikato Veterinary Services, Huntly, New Zealand
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  • WENDI D. ROE

    1. New Zealand Veterinary Pathology Ltd. and Department of Pathobiology, Institute of Veterinary and Animal Biological Sciences, Massey University, Palmerston North,
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J. S. Munday, Department of Pathobiology, Institute of Veterinary and Animal Biological Sciences, Massey University, Private Bag 11 222, Palmerston North, New Zealand. Tel.: 006463569099; Fax: 006463505636; E-mail: jmunday@massey.ac.nz

Abstract

Abstract  A 6.5-year-old male German Shepherd acutely developed renal and hepatic disease. Serology revealed high concentrations of antibodies against Leptospira copenhageni, and a presumptive diagnosis of leptospirosis was made. The dog was successfully treated with antibiotics and supportive care over a 12-day period. Sixty-two days after the initial presentation, alopecia predominantly involving the dorsum and perineal areas developed. The skin lesions expanded over a 20-day period. Histology revealed generalized calcinosis cutis with follicular atrophy. An injection of 0.01 mg kg−1 dexamethasone suppressed serum cortisol concentrations. No treatment was given and lesions resolved over the following 30 days. This is the third case of generalized calcinosis cutis that has developed in an adult dog after severe systemic disease. Both previous cases developed calcinosis cutis in association with blastomycosis. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of generalized calcinosis cutis in an adult dog in association with a presumptive bacterial infection.

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