Comparing 2.5%, 5%, and 10% Benzoyl Peroxide on Inflammatory Acne Vulgaris

Authors

  • Otto H. Mills Jr. Ph.D.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Departments of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Albert M. Kligman M.D., Ph.D.,

    1. Departments of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Peter Pochi M.D.,

    1. Departments of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Harriet Comite M.D.

    1. Departments of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
    Search for more papers by this author

Address for correspondence: Otto H. Mills, Jr., Ph.D., UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, One Robert Wood Johnson Place, New Brunswick, NJ 08903.

Abstract

ABSTRACT: A 2.5% formulation of benzoyl peroxide was compared with its vehicle, and with a 5% and a 10% proprietary benzoyl peroxide gel preparation in three double-blind studies involving 153 patients with mild to moderately severe acne vulgaris. The 2.5% benzoyl peroxide formulation was more effective than its vehicle and equivalent to the 5% and 10% concentrations in reducing the number of inflammatory lesions (papules and pustules). Desquamation, erythema, and symptoms.of burning with the 2.5% gel were less frequent than with the 10% preparation but equivalent to the 5% gel. The 2.5% formulation also significantly reduced Propionibacterium acnes and the percentage of free fatty acids in the surface lipids after 2 weeks of topical application.

Ancillary