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Pyoderma Gangrenosum in childhood

Authors

  • Ramesh M. Bhat MD, DVD, DNB, Assoc. Prof.,

    Corresponding author
    1. From the Department of Dermatology, Venereology & Leprosy, Fr. Muller Medical College & Hospital, Mangalore, India
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  • Sudhir S. Shetty MBBS, PG Res.,

    1. From the Department of Dermatology, Venereology & Leprosy, Fr. Muller Medical College & Hospital, Mangalore, India
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  • Ganesh H. Kamath DVD, Registrar

    1. From the Department of Dermatology, Venereology & Leprosy, Fr. Muller Medical College & Hospital, Mangalore, India
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Dr Ramesh M. Bhat md, dvd, dnb Associate Professor Department of Dermatology, Venereology & Leprosy Fr. Muller Medical College & Hospital Kankanady, Mangalore – 575 002 Karnataka India E-mail: rameshderma@yahoo.com

Abstract

Pyoderma Gangrenosum is a rare, ulcerative, necrotizing cutaneous disorder of unknown etiology.1 The lesions usually present as a painful nodule or pustule that breaks down to form a progressively enlarging ulcer with a raised tender, undermined edge.1 Pyoderma Gangrenosum was first described by Brunsting et al. in 1930,2 but the pathogenesis is still not clear. Local infection does not appear to be an etiologic factor even though Brunsting initially suggested this may be the cause.1–3 Its association with various autoimmune diseases and its response to immunosuppressive therapy suggests an immunologic basis for the disease.4,5 The characteristic feature of pyoderma gangrenosum is the development of lesions at sites of trauma: also known as pathergy phenomenon. Most cases of pyoderma gangrenosum occur mainly between the third and fifth decades of life, though disease can occur anytime between the first and ninth decades of life.6 We present a case of pyoderma gangrenosum in a 3-year-old boy, and review the features of pyoderma gangrenosum in children.

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