Lifestyle of Nordic people with psoriasis

Authors

  • Steingrimur Davidsson MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. From the Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Reykjavik, Reykjavik, Iceland, Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland, Department of Dermatology, Örebro Medical Center Hospital, Sweden, Department of Dermatology, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway, Blue Lagoon Psoriasis Treatment Center and Department of Dermatology, University of Iceland (Representing Faeroe Islands), Iceland, Department of Dermatology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark, and Psycho-oncology Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark
      Correspondence Steingrimur Davidsson, md Department of Dermatology Icelandic University Hospital Thverholt 18 105 Reykjavik Iceland E-mail: steingr@simnet.is
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  • Kirsti Blomqvist MD,

    1. From the Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Reykjavik, Reykjavik, Iceland, Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland, Department of Dermatology, Örebro Medical Center Hospital, Sweden, Department of Dermatology, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway, Blue Lagoon Psoriasis Treatment Center and Department of Dermatology, University of Iceland (Representing Faeroe Islands), Iceland, Department of Dermatology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark, and Psycho-oncology Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark
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  • Lars Molin MD, PhD,

    1. From the Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Reykjavik, Reykjavik, Iceland, Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland, Department of Dermatology, Örebro Medical Center Hospital, Sweden, Department of Dermatology, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway, Blue Lagoon Psoriasis Treatment Center and Department of Dermatology, University of Iceland (Representing Faeroe Islands), Iceland, Department of Dermatology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark, and Psycho-oncology Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark
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  • Cato Mørk MD,

    1. From the Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Reykjavik, Reykjavik, Iceland, Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland, Department of Dermatology, Örebro Medical Center Hospital, Sweden, Department of Dermatology, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway, Blue Lagoon Psoriasis Treatment Center and Department of Dermatology, University of Iceland (Representing Faeroe Islands), Iceland, Department of Dermatology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark, and Psycho-oncology Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark
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  • Bardur Sigurgeirsson MD, PhD,

    1. From the Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Reykjavik, Reykjavik, Iceland, Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland, Department of Dermatology, Örebro Medical Center Hospital, Sweden, Department of Dermatology, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway, Blue Lagoon Psoriasis Treatment Center and Department of Dermatology, University of Iceland (Representing Faeroe Islands), Iceland, Department of Dermatology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark, and Psycho-oncology Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark
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  • Hugh Zachariae MD, PhD,

    1. From the Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Reykjavik, Reykjavik, Iceland, Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland, Department of Dermatology, Örebro Medical Center Hospital, Sweden, Department of Dermatology, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway, Blue Lagoon Psoriasis Treatment Center and Department of Dermatology, University of Iceland (Representing Faeroe Islands), Iceland, Department of Dermatology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark, and Psycho-oncology Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark
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  • Robert Zachariae MSc, MDSci

    1. From the Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Reykjavik, Reykjavik, Iceland, Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland, Department of Dermatology, Örebro Medical Center Hospital, Sweden, Department of Dermatology, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway, Blue Lagoon Psoriasis Treatment Center and Department of Dermatology, University of Iceland (Representing Faeroe Islands), Iceland, Department of Dermatology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark, and Psycho-oncology Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark
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  • This paper was presented in part at the 10th European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (EADV) Congress, Munich, 2001

Correspondence Steingrimur Davidsson, md Department of Dermatology Icelandic University Hospital Thverholt 18 105 Reykjavik Iceland E-mail: steingr@simnet.is

Abstract

Aim  The Nordic Quality of Life Study was undertaken to assess the relationship between psoriasis and the quality of life in Nordic countries. The intention was also to determine whether there was a relationship between drinking, smoking, and the use of psychotherapeutic agents on the one hand, and psoriasis severity and quality of life on the other.

Materials and methods  A questionnaire was mailed to 11,300 members of the Nordic Psoriasis Associations. Additional psoriasis patients were recruited by dermatologists (387) or admitted to dermatologic wards (385). These patients also underwent a physical examination, and their Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) was determined. The questionnaire included the Psoriasis Disability Index (PDI), Psoriasis Life Stress Inventory (PLSI), and additional questions on disease severity, treatment, and psoriasis arthritis. It also included questions regarding lifestyle issues, such as smoking, alcohol use, and the use of tranquilizers, antidepressants, and sleeping medications.

Results  The response rate for members was 50.2%. Included in the evaluation were 6497 patients. Men drank significantly more beer and liquor than women. The number of beers per day had a weak correlation with the PDI. Wine consumption, however, showed a weak, but significant, negative correlation with both PDI and PLSI. Patients admitted to dermatologic wards smoked more cigarettes and drank less wine than the other two groups. Significant differences were found between countries with regard to total alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking. The number of cigarettes and the use of tranquilizers, sleeping medications, and antidepressants showed small, but significant, positive correlations with psoriasis quality of life measures.

Conclusions  Cigarette smoking and the use of tranquilizers, sleeping medications, and antidepressants are statistically correlated with impaired psoriasis-related quality of life.

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