Development of vitiligo during melanoma treatment with a novel survivin inhibitor: a case report and review of the literature

Authors

  • Mayumi Fujita MD, PhD,

    1. From the Department of Dermatology and Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado
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  • Whitney A. High MD,

    1. From the Department of Dermatology and Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado
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  • Shabnam Asgari BS,

    1. From the Department of Dermatology and Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado
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  • Karl D. Lewis MD,

    1. From the Department of Dermatology and Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado
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  • Rene Gonzalez MD

    1. From the Department of Dermatology and Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado
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Mayumi Fujita, md, phd Department of Dermatology University of Colorado Denver Mail Stop #8127, PO Box 6511 12801 E. 17th Ave. RC-1 South Aurora, CO 80010-7163 E-mail: mayumi.fujita@ucdenver.edu

Abstract

Background  The development of vitiligo has been associated with an improved clinical response in melanoma patients.

Methods  We report a case of vitiligo associated with a novel antisurvivin drug and review the literature to determine the pathogenesis of vitiligo occurring during melanoma treatment.

Results  A 78-year-old man with stage IV malignant melanoma developed vitiligo after the first therapeutic cycle of a novel antisurvivin drug. Although his vitiligo remained static, his melanoma continued to progress and he died in 8 months. A review of the literature demonstrates a relationship between vitiligo development and improved clinical response in many melanoma cases treated with immunotherapy; however, the relationship may depend on the type of treatment.

Conclusions  Understanding complex immune responses in vitiliginous skin and melanoma sites is important in order to interpret the development of vitiligo occurring during melanoma treatment.

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