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Determinants for the successful establishment of exotic ants in New Zealand

Authors

  • Philip J. Lester

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, PO Box 600, Wellington, New Zealand
      Correspondence: Philip J. Lester, School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, PO Box 600, Wellington, New Zealand. Tel.: +64 4 463-5096; Fax: +64 4 463 5331; E-mail: phil.lester@vuw.ac.nz
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Correspondence: Philip J. Lester, School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, PO Box 600, Wellington, New Zealand. Tel.: +64 4 463-5096; Fax: +64 4 463 5331; E-mail: phil.lester@vuw.ac.nz

ABSTRACT

Biological invasions can dramatically alter ecosystems. An ability to predict the establishment success for exotic species is important for biosecurity and conservation purposes. I examine the exotic New Zealand ant fauna for characteristics that predict or determine an exotic species’ ability to establish. Quarantine records show interceptions of 66 ant species: 17 of which have established, 43 have failed to establish, whereas nests of another six are periodically observed but have failed to establish permanently (called ‘ephemeral’ establishment). Mean temperature at the highest latitude and interception variables were the only factors significantly different between established, failed or ephemeral groups. Aspects of life history, such as competitive behaviour and morphology, were not different between groups. However, in a stepwise discriminant analysis, small size was a key factor influencing establishment success. Interception rate and climate were also secondarily important. The resulting classification table predicted establishment success with 71% accuracy. Because not all exotic species are represented in quarantine records, a further discriminant model is described without interception data. Though with less accuracy (65%) than the full model, it still correctly predicted the success or failure of four species not used in the previous analysis. Techniques for improving the prediction accuracy are discussed. Predicting which species will establish in a new area appears an achievable goal, which will be a valuable tool for conservation biology.

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