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N-Acetylcysteine reduces early- and late-stage cocaine seeking without affecting cocaine taking in rats

Authors

  • Jennifer E. Murray,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, UK
      Jennifer E. Murray, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK. E-mail: jem98@cam.ac.uk
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  • Barry J. Everitt,

    1. Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, UK
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  • David Belin

    1. INSERM AVENIR team, Psychobiology of Compulsive Disorders, Institut de Physiologie et de Biologie Cellulaires, & Université de Poitiers, France
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Jennifer E. Murray, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK. E-mail: jem98@cam.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has been suggested to have therapeutic potential in the treatment of drug addiction through its effects on brain glutamate homeostasis. Here we show that NAC treatment resulted in dose-dependent reductions in cocaine seeking at both early and late stages of acquisition and maintenance of cocaine-seeking behavior, while confirming it had no effect on cocaine reinforcement. The results indicate that NAC is able to significantly diminish the propensity to seek cocaine early and late in the development of addiction and, taken together with previous work, indicates significant potential in relapse prevention.

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