Aspirin Intolerance and Recurrent urticaria in Normal Adults and Children

Epidemiology and Review

Authors

  • Russell A. Settipane,

    Corresponding author
    1. The Division of Biology and Medicine, brown University, and the Division of Allergy, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, R.I. U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Herbert P. Constattine,

    1. The Division of Biology and Medicine, brown University, and the Division of Allergy, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, R.I. U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Guy A. Settipane

    1. The Division of Biology and Medicine, brown University, and the Division of Allergy, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, R.I. U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author

Russell A. Settipane, Rhode Island Hospital, Division of Allergy, 593 Eddy Street, Prov., R. I. 02902, U.S.A.

Abstract

The frequency of aspirin intolerance by history in 2,592 normal individuals was 0.3%. Although the frequency of aspirin intolerance was similar in adults and children, the bronchospastic type predominated in adults, and only the urticarial regardless of etiology, was significantly greater in adults than in children. The frequency of recurrent urticaria, regardless of etiology, was significantly greater in adults than in children (3.8% vs. 0.3, P<0.001). In adults the frequency of aspirin intolerance was over 20 times greater in individuals with recurrent urticaria than in normal individuals (6.5% vs. 0.3%, P<0.001).

Ancillary