Insect Allergy

A Comparative Study Including Case Histories and Immunological Parameters

Authors

  • H. Mosbech

    Corresponding author
    1. Allergy Clinic and Medical Dept. B, Frederiksborg Central Country Hospital, Hillerød, and Medical Dept. TA, Rigshospital, Copenhagen, Denmark
      Address: H. Mosbech, M.D., Medical Dept. TA 7511, Rigshopitalet, Tagensvej 20, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark
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Address: H. Mosbech, M.D., Medical Dept. TA 7511, Rigshopitalet, Tagensvej 20, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark

Abstract

One hundred and seventeen persons all stung by yellow jacket (YJ) and/or bee were examined by means of skin prick test with venom of these insects, skin prick test with 10 inhalant allergens and analyses of total IgE. Specific IgE and IgG against honey bee and YJ venom. Eighty-seven persons had had a systemic reaction. Positive correlations (P < 0.05) were found between results of skin prick tests and specific IgE against venoms and, for YJ, between the severity of symptoms after sting and the size of skin prick test with the venom. That some of the more severe symptoms could have been caused by non-immunological mechanisms could explain why a significant correlation was present only between the results of the prick test and specific IgE and not between these tests and the clinical symptoms. Specific IgE values against YJ and honey bee venom showed convariation, although no correlation could be demonstrated between the clinical symptoms after stings from these insects, or between skin prick test results using the two different extracts. The severity of the sting reactions was not correlated to age, atopic disposition, amount of total IgE, number of stings during life, or positive skin prick test to inhalant allergens. It is concluded that in insect allergy, specific IgE analysis and skin prick tests are supplementary.

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