Oral allergy syndrome: the effect of astemizole

Authors

  • C. Bindslev-Jensen,

    Corresponding author
    1. Food Allergy Unit TTA 7523, Medical Department TTA, National University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark
      C. Bindslev Jensen, Food Allergy Unit TTA 7523, Medical Department TTA, National University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark
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  • A. Vibits,

    1. Food Allergy Unit TTA 7523, Medical Department TTA, National University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark
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  • P. Stahl Skov,

    1. Food Allergy Unit TTA 7523, Medical Department TTA, National University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark
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  • B. Weeke

    1. Food Allergy Unit TTA 7523, Medical Department TTA, National University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark
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C. Bindslev Jensen, Food Allergy Unit TTA 7523, Medical Department TTA, National University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark

Abstract

The effect of treatment with astemizole (Hismanal®) on symptoms elicited by ingestion of hazelnuts in birch pollen-allergic patients (the oral allergy syndrome) was investigated. Thirty patients with a well-documented allergy to silver birch, experiencing symptoms when ingesting hazelnuts, were included in the study. All had a positive skin prick test (SPT) to birch, whereas 29 and 27, respectively, showed a positive RAST and basophil histamine release test (HR) to birch. In contrast, only 15 patients had a positive SPT to hazelnut, 13 had a positive RAST, whereas 24 had a positive HR. Alter two oral provocations with hazelnuts the patients were randomized to receive either 10 mg of astemizole or placebo daily for 2 weeks in a double blind protocol followed by two oral provocations. Treatment with astemizole significantly reduced the symptoms compared with placebo (P= 0.004); however, without completely abolishing the symptoms.

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