Get access

New cohorts of naive T cells exacerbate ongoing allergy but can be suppressed by regulatory T cells

Authors

  • F. Hauet-Broere,

    1. Department of Molecular Cell Biology and Immunology, VU Medical Center, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam
    2. Department of Biomedical Research, Numico Research BV, PO Box 7005, Wageningen, The Netherlands
    3. Present address: Infectious Diseases and Immunology, UU, Yalelaan 1, 3584 CL Utrecht, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author
  • W. W. J. Unger,

    1. Department of Molecular Cell Biology and Immunology, VU Medical Center, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam
    2. Present address: Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion, LUMC, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author
  • L. A. van Berkel,

    1. Department of Molecular Cell Biology and Immunology, VU Medical Center, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam
    2. Present address: Pediatric Gastroenterology, Erasmus MC, PO Box 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author
  • J. Garssen,

    1. Department of Biomedical Research, Numico Research BV, PO Box 7005, Wageningen, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author
  • M. A. Hoijer,

    1. Department of Biomedical Research, Numico Research BV, PO Box 7005, Wageningen, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author
  • G. Kraal,

    1. Department of Molecular Cell Biology and Immunology, VU Medical Center, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam
    Search for more papers by this author
  • J. N. Samsom

    1. Department of Molecular Cell Biology and Immunology, VU Medical Center, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam
    2. Present address: Pediatric Gastroenterology, Erasmus MC, PO Box 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author

Janneke N. Samsom
Laboratory of Pediatric Gastroenterology
Erasmus MC
Room EE1571A
PO Box 1738
3000 DR Rotterdam
The Netherlands

Abstract

Although as pretreatment oral tolerance is a potent means to achieve systemic suppression, its application in ongoing disease is controversial. Here we propose that availability of naive T cells may critically determine whether immunological tolerance is achieved during ongoing antigenic reactivity. Infusion of naive antigen-specific T cells into mice directly prior to eliciting a secondary Th2 response induces these naive cells to actively engage in the antigenic response despite presence of established memory. Naive antigen-specific T-cells divided faster, produced more interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4 and IL-5 and enhanced immunoglobulin E (IgE) release during a secondary Th2 response, compared with naive T cells that were infused prior to a primary response. Despite such contribution by new cohorts of naive T cells co-infusion of mucosal Tr together with naive T cells could suppress enhanced IgE release during a secondary Th2 response. We conclude that naive T cells contribute to a secondary Th2 response and although they can still be suppressed in the presence of sufficient numbers of mucosal Tr, they may interfere with potential therapeutic application of mucosal tolerance.

Ancillary