The allergen bronchoprovocation model: an important tool for the investigation of new asthma anti-inflammatory therapies

Authors

  • L.-P. Boulet,

    1. The Clinical Investigative Collaboration, Canadian Network of Centers of Excellence ‘AllerGen’1Unité de recherche en pneumologie, Hôpital Laval, Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de l’Université Laval, QC; 2Department of Medicine, McMaster University Medical Center, Hamilton, ON; 3Department of Medicine, Division of Respirology, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Royal University Hospital/University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
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  • 1 G. Gauvreau,

    1. The Clinical Investigative Collaboration, Canadian Network of Centers of Excellence ‘AllerGen’1Unité de recherche en pneumologie, Hôpital Laval, Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de l’Université Laval, QC; 2Department of Medicine, McMaster University Medical Center, Hamilton, ON; 3Department of Medicine, Division of Respirology, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Royal University Hospital/University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
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  • 2 M.-E. Boulay,

    1. The Clinical Investigative Collaboration, Canadian Network of Centers of Excellence ‘AllerGen’1Unité de recherche en pneumologie, Hôpital Laval, Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de l’Université Laval, QC; 2Department of Medicine, McMaster University Medical Center, Hamilton, ON; 3Department of Medicine, Division of Respirology, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Royal University Hospital/University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
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  • 1 P. O’Byrne,

    1. The Clinical Investigative Collaboration, Canadian Network of Centers of Excellence ‘AllerGen’1Unité de recherche en pneumologie, Hôpital Laval, Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de l’Université Laval, QC; 2Department of Medicine, McMaster University Medical Center, Hamilton, ON; 3Department of Medicine, Division of Respirology, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Royal University Hospital/University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
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  • and 2 D. W. Cockcroft 3

    1. The Clinical Investigative Collaboration, Canadian Network of Centers of Excellence ‘AllerGen’1Unité de recherche en pneumologie, Hôpital Laval, Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de l’Université Laval, QC; 2Department of Medicine, McMaster University Medical Center, Hamilton, ON; 3Department of Medicine, Division of Respirology, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Royal University Hospital/University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
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Dr Louis-Philippe Boulet
Hôpital Laval
2725, Chemin Sainte-Foy
Québec
Canada GlV 4G5

Abstract

Allergen bronchoprovocation tests have been used for more than two decades in the investigation of respiratory allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis. These bronchial challenges are now well standardized and can offer key information on the therapeutic potential of new agents and on their anti-inflammatory effects on the airways. Both standard and low-dose allergen provocations are safe when performed by experienced investigators and do not lead to persistent worsening of asthma or change in airway function. The evaluation of new therapeutic agents by these methods can also provide important information on the mechanisms of development and persistence of airway diseases.

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