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Prevalence and impact of rhinitis in asthma. SACRA, a cross-sectional nation-wide study in Japan

Authors

  • K. Ohta,

    1. Division of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Department of Medicine Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
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    • Edited by: Wytske Fokkens

  • P.-J. Bousquet,

    1. Département de Biostatistique, Epidémiologie Clinique, Santé Publique et Information Médicale, Groupe Hospitalo-Universtaire Carémeau, Nîmes, France
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    • Chairman of GINA Japan Committee, Chairman of ARIA Japan Committee.

  • H. Aizawa,

    1. Division of Respirology, Neurology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine,Kurume University School of Medicine, Fukuoka
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    • Member of Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA2LEN).

    • Member of ARIA Japan Committee.

  • K. Akiyama,

    1. National Hospital Organization, Sagamihara National Hospital, Kanagawa
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    • Member of Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA2LEN).

    • Member of ARIA Japan Committee.

  • M. Adachi,

    1. Division of Respirology and Allergology, Department of Medicine, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo
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    • Member of Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA2LEN).

    • Member of ARIA Japan Committee.

  • M. Ichinose,

    1. Third Department of Internal Medicine, Wakayama Medical University, School of Medicine, Wakayama
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    • Member of ARIA Japan Committee.

  • M. Ebisawa,

    1. Department of Allergy Clinical Research Center for Allergy and Rheumatology, National Hospital Organization, Sagamihara National Hospital, Kanagawa
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    • Member of Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA2LEN).

    • Member of ARIA Japan Committee.

  • G. Tamura,

    1. Airway Institute in Sendai, Miyagi
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    • Member of ARIA Japan Committee.

  • A. Nagai,

    1. First Department of Medicine, Tokyo Women’s University, Tokyo
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    • Member of ARIA Japan Committee.

  • S. Nishima,

    1. NHO,Fukuoka National Hospital, Fukuoka
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    • Member of ARIA Japan Committee.

  • T. Fukuda,

    1. Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Clinical Immunology Dokkyo University School of Medicine, Tochigi
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    • Member of ARIA Japan Committee.

  • A. Morikawa,

    1. Gunma University, Kitakanto Allergy Institute, Kibonoie Hospital, Gunma
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    • Member of Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA2LEN).

    • Member of ARIA Japan Committee.

  • Y. Okamoto,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba
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    • Member of Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA2LEN).

  • Y. Kohno,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba
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    • Member of Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA2LEN).

  • H. Saito,

    1. National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Tokyo
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    • Member of Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA2LEN).

  • H. Takenaka,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology, Osaka Medical College, Osaka, Japan
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    • Member of Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA2LEN).

  • L. Grouse,

    1. MCR, Seattle, WA, USA
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  • J. Bousquet

    1. Service des Maladies Respiratoires, Hôpital Arnaud de Villeneuve, Montpellier, France
    2. Inserm, CESP Centre for research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Respiratory and Environmental Epidemiology team, Villejuif, France
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    • Chairman of GINA Japan Committee, Chairman of ARIA Japan Committee.


  • Member of GINA Japan Committee.

Ken Ohta, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605, Japan.
Tel.: +81 3 3964 1211
Fax: +81 3 3964 5436
E-mail:kenohta@med.teikyo-u.ac.jp

Abstract

To cite this article: Ohta K, Bousquet P-J, Aizawa H, Akiyama K, Adachi M, Ichinose M, Ebisawa M, Tamura G, Nagai A, Nishima S, Fukuda T, Morikawa A, Okamoto Y, Kohno Y, Saito H, Takenaka H, Grouse L, Bousquet J. Prevalence and impact of rhinitis in asthma: SACRA, a cross-sectional nation-wide study in Japan. Allergy 2011; 66: 1287–1295.

Abstract

Background:  Asthma and rhinitis are common co-morbidities everywhere in the world but nation-wide studies assessing rhinitis in asthmatics using questionnaires based on guidelines are not available.

Objective:  To assess the prevalence, classification, and severity of rhinitis using the Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) criteria in Japanese patients with diagnosed and treated asthma.

Methods:  The study was performed from March to August 2009. Patients in physicians’ waiting rooms, or physicians themselves, filled out questionnaires on rhinitis and asthma based on ARIA and Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) diagnostic guides. The patients answered questions on the severity of the diseases and a Visual Analog Scale. Their physicians made the diagnosis of rhinitis.

Results:  In this study, 1910 physicians enrolled 29 518 asthmatics; 15 051 (51.0%) questionnaires were administered by physician, and 26 680 (90.4%) patients were evaluable. Self- and physician-administered questionnaires gave similar results. Rhinitis was diagnosed in 68.5% of patients with self-administered questionnaires and 66.2% with physician-administered questionnaires. In this study, 994 (7.6%) patients with self-administered and 561 (5.2%) patients with physician-administered questionnaires indicated rhinitis symptoms on the questionnaires without a physician’s diagnosis of rhinitis. Most patients with the physician’s diagnosis of rhinitis had moderate/severe rhinitis. Asthma control was significantly impaired in patients with a physician’s diagnosis of rhinitis for all GINA clinical criteria except exacerbations. There were significantly more patients with uncontrolled asthma as defined by GINA in those with a physician’s diagnosis of rhinitis (25.4% and 29.7%) by comparison with those without rhinitis (18.0% and 22.8%).

Conclusion:  Rhinitis is common in asthma and impairs asthma control.

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