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Prevalence and determinants of physical activity and fluid intake in kidney transplant recipients

Authors

  • Elisa J. Gordon,

    1. Department of Surgery, Transplant Surgery Division, Institute for Healthcare Studies, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL
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  • Thomas R. Prohaska,

    1. Center for Research on Health and Aging, Institute for Health Research and Policy (MC 275), School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
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  • Mary P. Gallant,

    1. Department of Health Policy, Management, and Behavior, School of Public Health, University at Albany, SUNY, One University Place, Rensselaer, NY
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  • Ashwini R. Sehgal,

    1. Center for Reducing Health Disparities and Division of Nephrology, MetroHealth Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Rammelkamp Research & Educ., Cleveland, OH
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  • David Strogatz,

    1. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University at Albany, SUNY, One University Place, Rensselaer, NY
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  • David Conti,

    1. Department of Surgery, Division of Transplantation, Albany Medical Center, Albany, NY
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  • Laura A. Siminoff

    1. Department of Social and Behavioral Health, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA
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Corresponding author: Elisa J. Gordon, PhD, MPH, Research Associate Professor, Department of Surgery, Transplant Surgery Division, Institute for Healthcare Studies, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 750 N. Lakeshore Drive, 10th floor, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.
Tel.: +312 503 5563; fax: +312 503 2777;
e-mail: e-gordon@northwestern.edu

Abstract

Gordon EJ, Prohaska TR, Gallant MP, Sehgal AR, Strogatz D, Conti D, Siminoff LA. Prevalence and determinants of physical activity and fluid intake in kidney transplant recipients.
Clin Transplant 2010: 24: E69–E81. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

Abstract:  Background and significance:  Self-care for kidney transplantation is recommended to maintain kidney function. Little is known about levels of self-care practices and demographic, psychosocial, and health-related correlates.

Aim:  To investigate patients’ self-reported exercise and fluid intake, demographic and psychosocial factors associated with these self-care practices, and health-related quality of life.

Methods:  Eighty-eight of 158 kidney recipients from two academic medical centers completed a semi-structured interview and surveys 2 months post-transplant.

Results:  Most patients were sedentary (76%) with a quarter exercising either regularly (11%) or not at current recommendations (13%). One-third (35%) reported drinking the recommended 3 L of fluid daily. Multivariate analyses indicated that private insurance, high self-efficacy, and better physical functioning were significantly associated with engaging in physical activity (p < 0.05); while male gender, private insurance, high self-efficacy, and not attributing oneself responsible for transplant success were significant predictors of adherence to fluid intake (p < 0.05). Despite the significance of these predictors, models for physical activity and fluid intake explained 10–15% of the overall variance in these behaviors. Multivariate analyses indicated that younger age, high value of exercise, and higher social functioning significantly (p < 0.05) predicted high self-efficacy for physical activity, while being married significantly (p < 0.05) predicted high self-efficacy for fluid intake.

Conclusion:  Identifying patients at risk of inadequate self-care practice is essential for educating patients about the importance of self-care.

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