Direct pressure measurement in the hepatic artery during liver transplantation: can it prevent the “steal” syndrome?

Authors


  • Conflict of interest: None.

Corresponding author: Maciej Wojcicki, MD, PhD, Division of Hepatobiliary Surgery and Liver Transplantation, Marie Curie Hospital, ul. Arkonska 4, 71-455 Szczecin, Poland.
Tel.:/fax: +48 91 454 16 93;
e-mail: drmwojcicki@wp.pl

Abstract

Wojcicki M, Pakosz-Golanowska M, Lubikowski J, Post M, Jarosz K, Milkiewicz P. Direct pressure measurement in the hepatic artery during liver transplantation: can it prevent the “steal” syndrome?
Clin Transplant 2011 DOI: 10.1111/j.1399-0012.2011.01478.x.
© 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

Abstract:  Splenic artery “steal” syndrome after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is an important cause of graft dysfunction. Direct pressure measurement in the hepatic (HA) and radial artery (RA) may identify patients at risk allowing its prevention. This observational study compared radial and hepatic mean arterial pressures (MAP) measured during 100 OLTs performed in 99 recipients, in whom the HA was considered suitable for the anastomosis. A difference of ≥5 mmHg between the radial and hepatic MAP was arbitrarily chosen as the criterion for inflow modulation. Seven patients fulfilled this criterion showing a MAP gradient that was significantly different compared to the others (−10.8 ± 3.3 vs. 2.6 ± 5.0; p < 0.0001). They underwent splenic artery ligation (n = 5), arcuate ligament division (n = 1) and aortohepatic bypass grafting (n = 1) that all resulted in immediate normalization of the arterial inflow pressure to the graft. The splenic artery “steal” syndrome occurred in one patient (day 2 after OLT) in whom the mean HA pressure normalized during OLT following arcuate ligament division, suggesting pathology within the graft as the most likely etiology. Our results indicate that radial MAP can reflect the hepatic MAP during OLT. If a substantial pressure gradient is found, it can be corrected by intraoperative splenic artery ligation or arcuate ligament division.

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