HLA-G polymorphisms, genetic susceptibility, and clinical outcome in childhood neuroblastoma

Authors

  • D. T. Lau,

    1. Children's Cancer Institute Australia for Medical Research, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Randwick, NSW, Australia
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  • M. D. Norris,

    1. Children's Cancer Institute Australia for Medical Research, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Randwick, NSW, Australia
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  • G. M. Marshall,

    1. Children's Cancer Institute Australia for Medical Research, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Randwick, NSW, Australia
    2. Centre for Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders, Sydney Children's Hospital, Randwick, NSW, Australia
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  • M. Haber,

    1. Children's Cancer Institute Australia for Medical Research, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Randwick, NSW, Australia
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  • L. J. Ashton

    Corresponding author
    1. Children's Cancer Institute Australia for Medical Research, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Randwick, NSW, Australia
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Lesley J Ashton
Children's Cancer Institute Australia for Medical Research
Lowy Cancer Research Centre
University of New South Wales
PO Box 81, Randwick
NSW 2031
Australia
Tel: +61 29 385 2162
Fax: +61 29 662 6583
e-mail: lashton@ccia.unsw.edu.au

Abstract

Neuroblastoma is the most common solid tumor in children less than 5 years of age. The early onset of neuroblastoma suggests that genes involved in fetal development and pregnancy may have a putative role in the etiology of neuroblastoma. The human leukocyte antigen subtype G (HLA-G) molecule plays an important role in immune response regulation and appears to regulate immune tolerance during early pregnancy as well as tumor immunosurveillance. Elevated levels of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) have been detected in a number of malignancies including serum samples from neuroblastoma and have been reported to be predictive of tumor relapse in neuroblastoma. In light of previous investigations suggesting that single nucleotide polymorphisms in the HLA-G gene may impact on protein expression levels and isoform production, we examined the influence of HLA-G polymorphisms on the susceptibility and clinical outcome of neuroblastoma in 163 neuroblastoma patients and 404 healthy controls. The distribution of HLA-G polymorphisms, alleles, or allelic groups did not differ between children diagnosed with neuroblastoma and healthy controls. Our analyses did not detect an association between common HLA-G polymorphisms and clinical outcome in patients treated for neuroblastoma.

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