Food-additive intolerance and its correlation with atopy in children with recurrent or intermittent urticaria-angioedema

Authors

  • M. de Martino,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Allergy and Clinical Immunology Unit, University of Florence, Anna Meyer Children's Hospital, Florence, Italy.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • M. Peruzzi,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Allergy and Clinical Immunology Unit, University of Florence, Anna Meyer Children's Hospital, Florence, Italy.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • L. Galli,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Allergy and Clinical Immunology Unit, University of Florence, Anna Meyer Children's Hospital, Florence, Italy.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • L. Lega,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Allergy and Clinical Immunology Unit, University of Florence, Anna Meyer Children's Hospital, Florence, Italy.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • E. Zammarchi,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Allergy and Clinical Immunology Unit, University of Florence, Anna Meyer Children's Hospital, Florence, Italy.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • A. Vierucci

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pediatrics, Allergy and Clinical Immunology Unit, University of Florence, Anna Meyer Children's Hospital, Florence, Italy.
    Search for more papers by this author

Alberto Vierucci, Professor of Pediatrics and Clinical Immunology Allergy and Clinical Immunology Unit Department of Pediatrics, University of Florence Anna Meyer Children's Hospital via Luca Giordano 13 50132 Florence, Italy

Abstract

A total of 120 placebo-negative children with intermittent or recurrent urticaria-angiodema (U-A) were orally challenged with 7 food-additives (F-A): tartrazine (E102), sunset yellow (E110), erythrosine (E127), annatto (E160b), sodium benzoate (E211), acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA) and aspartame. The results of the challenges were correlated with familial and personal history of atopic diseases, the presence of inhalantand food-specific IgE (evaluated by skin testing and RAST), total IgE levels, values of circulating eosinophils, physical urticaria, C3, C4 and Cl-inhibitor levels, the presence of circulating immune complexes, and of Candida albicans, parasite, hepatitis B virus and Epstein-Barr virus infection. Fifty-six (46. 4%) children had one or more positive challenge (s). Among them the following frequencies of positive challenges were recorded: E110 = 64. 2%, E160b = 60. 7%, E211: 57. 1%; E102 = 50.0%, aspartame = 48. 2%, E127 = 35. 7%, ASA = 12. 5%. Positive challenges correlated with none of the variables considered. In particular, positive challenges were clearly unrelated to an atopic condition. It is suggested that: a) F-A intolerance is frequent in children with recurrent or intermittent U-A; b) aspartame may be a causative agent of U-A in childhood; c) F-A intolerance is unrelated to other causes of U-A in children.

Ancillary