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Disparate geographic prevalences of asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic eczema among adolescents in five Canadian cities

Authors

  • Hong-Yu Wang,

    1. Firestone Institute for Respiratory Health, St. Joseph’s Healthcare, Hamilton, ON, Canada
    2. The Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
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  • Marcia M. M. Pizzichini,

    1. Firestone Institute for Respiratory Health, St. Joseph’s Healthcare, Hamilton, ON, Canada
    2. The Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
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  • Allan B. Becker,

    1. The Section of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
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  • Joanne M. Duncan,

    1. Firestone Institute for Respiratory Health, St. Joseph’s Healthcare, Hamilton, ON, Canada
    2. The Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
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  • Alexander C. Ferguson,

    1. The Division of Allergy, Department of Paediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
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  • Justina M. Greene,

    1. Firestone Institute for Respiratory Health, St. Joseph’s Healthcare, Hamilton, ON, Canada
    2. The Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
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  • Donna C. Rennie,

    1. The Canadian Centre for Health & Safety in Agriculture, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
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  • Ambikaipakan Senthilselvan,

    1. Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada
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  • Brett W. Taylor,

    1. Emergency Department, IWK-Grace Health Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada
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  • Malcolm R. Sears

    1. Firestone Institute for Respiratory Health, St. Joseph’s Healthcare, Hamilton, ON, Canada
    2. The Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
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Malcolm R. Sears, Firestone Institute for Respiratory Health, St. Joseph’s Healthcare, 50 Charlton Ave. E., Hamilton ON L8N 4A6, Canada
Tel.: 905 522 1155 ext. 33286
Fax: 905 521 6132
E-mail: searsm@mcmaster.ca

Abstract

Wang H-Y, Pizzichini MMM, Becker AB, Duncan JM, Ferguson AC, Greene JM, Rennie DC, Senthilselvan A, Taylor BW, Sears MR. Disparate geographic prevalences of asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic eczema among adolescents in five Canadian cities.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010: 21: 867–877.
© 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S

To assess concordance of prevalence rates of asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic eczema symptoms among adolescents in five Canadian cities. The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase 3 written questionnaires were answered by 8334 adolescents aged 13 to 14 in Vancouver, Saskatoon, Winnipeg, Hamilton and Halifax, Canada. Prevalence rates of current symptoms ranged from 13.7–33.0% for wheezing, 14.6–22.6% for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and 8.2–10.4% for atopic eczema. Using Hamilton as reference, the prevalence of wheezing was significantly higher in Halifax (OR = 1.58; 95% CI 1.36–1.84) and Saskatoon (1.27; 1.07–1.50) and significantly lower in Vancouver (0.51; 0.44–0.59). In contrast, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis was significantly more prevalent in Winnipeg (1.39; 1.16–1.68) and Halifax (1.36; 1.14–1.61) and trended lower in Saskatoon (0.81; 0.66–1.00). Atopic eczema was significantly more prevalent in Winnipeg (1.31; 1.01–1.69) and Vancouver (1.28; 1.04–1.58). Multivariable logistic regression analyses showed the region of residence, being born in Canada, recent use of acetaminophen and heavy exposure to traffic exhaust were significantly associated with all three allergic conditions, while obesity and having two or more smokers at home was only associated with increased risk for wheezing. Chinese ethnicity decreased that risk. Among five Canadian centres, the highest prevalence rates of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis or atopic eczema were not observed in the same regions as the highest prevalence rates of wheezing. This disparity in regional variations in the prevalence rates suggests dissimilar risk factors for the development or expression of wheezing (asthma), allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic eczema.

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