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Transplantation tolerance in pediatric recipients: Lessons and challenges

Authors

  • Kathryn J. Tinckam,

    1. Transplantation Research Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
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  • Mohamed H. Sayegh

    1. Transplantation Research Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
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Mohamed H. Sayegh, Transplantation Research Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA
Tel.: 617 732 5259
Fax: 617 732 5254
E-mail: msayegh@rics.bwh.harvard.edu

Abstract

Abstract:  Clinical transplantation tolerance has remained an elusive goal in the 50 yr since it was first described in experimental animals. Greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for allorecognition have allowed for the development of promising immunosuppressive strategies that may bring us closer to reproducible induction of tolerance; consideration of past successes and failures from both clinical and basic science is required to define future challenges facing this field. This article reviews mechanisms of self and transplantation tolerance, translation of basic science research to clinical protocols in animals and human beings, the changing role of immunosuppression, complications following tolerance induction and controversies surrounding the choice of patients for tolerance trials with a focus on issues relevant to pediatric patients. The role of the Immune Tolerance Network is discussed along with realistic goals for tolerance induction in human beings over the next decade.

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