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Low bone mineral density and nutritional vitamin D deficiency in pediatric renal transplant recipients: Assessment of risk factors and response to oral vitamin D therapy

Authors


Asha Moudgil, Department of Nephrology, Children’s National Medical Center, 111 Michigan Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20010
Tel.: 202 476 5058
Fax: 202 476 3475
E-mail: amoudgil@cnmc.org

Abstract

Sgambat K, Tuchman S, Ryan L, Wood R, Moudgil A. Low bone mineral density and nutritional vitamin D deficiency in pediatric renal transplant recipients: Assessment of risk factors and response to oral vitamin D therapy.
Pediatr Transplantation 2011: 15: 790–797. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

Abstract:  VitD deficiency and bone disease are common after Tx. Prevalence and risk factors for low VitD and BMD and response to VitD therapy were investigated in pediatric renal Tx recipients. 25-hydroxy VitD levels of 71 Tx were compared to 54 healthy AA children. DXA of 44 Tx were compared to 47 AA controls. Of Tx, 59% were AA. Majority (59.1%) of Tx were VitD deficient (23.9%) or insufficient (35.2%). Prevalence of low VitD levels was double in AA (73.9%) vs. non-AA Tx (37.7%), (p = 0.003). Low VitD among Tx was associated with AA ethnicity (p < 0.01), winter (p < 0.05), older age (p < 0.05), males (p < 0.05) and time <6 months post Tx (p < 0.05). Tx with low VitD were treated with oral ergocalciferol or cholecalciferol (23 each); 13% treated with ergocalciferol vs. 82.6% treated with cholecalciferol achieved repletion (p < 0.0001). Of 36 Tx with whole body DXA, 19.5% had BMD (z < −1) after height adjustment. AA Tx had 3.4-fold higher risk of low BMD vs. controls (p < 0.05). Low VitD and BMD are prevalent in children after renal Tx. Better repletion of VitD is achieved with cholecalciferol.

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