A model for simulating transpiration of Eucalyptus salmonophloia trees

Authors

  • Matthias Langensiepen,

    Corresponding author
    1. Modeling Plant Systems, Institute of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture and Horticulture, Humboldt-University of Berlin. Invalidenstrasse 42, 10115 Berlin, Germany
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  • Stephen Burgess,

    1. School of Plant Biology, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway Crawley WA 6009, Australia
    2. Cooperative Research Centre for Plant-Based Management of Dryland Salinity, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009, Australia
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  • Hans Lambers,

    1. School of Plant Biology, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway Crawley WA 6009, Australia
    2. Cooperative Research Centre for Plant-Based Management of Dryland Salinity, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009, Australia
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  • Patrick Mitchell,

    1. School of Plant Biology, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway Crawley WA 6009, Australia
    2. Cooperative Research Centre for Plant-Based Management of Dryland Salinity, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009, Australia
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  • Erik Veneklaas

    1. School of Plant Biology, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway Crawley WA 6009, Australia
    2. Cooperative Research Centre for Plant-Based Management of Dryland Salinity, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009, Australia
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  • Edited by V. Hurry

e-mail: matthias@langensiepen.net

Abstract

Understanding the water relations of Eucalyptus trees plays an important role in finding solutions to dryland salinity in southern Australia. A model for studying structure–function relationships in isolated tree crowns (radiation absorption, transpiration and photosynthesis, RATP) was parameterized to permit the seasonal transpiration course of a Eucalyptus salmonophloia tree to be quantified. Model responses to different parameterizations were tested in a sensitivity analysis. Predictive quality was mostly affected by the accuracy of information about leaf area density and stomatal responses to air vapor pressure deficit, and to a lesser extend by foliage dispersion. Assuming simple, non-synergistic influences of changes in photosynthetic active radiation and air vapor pressure deficit on stomatal transpiration control, the model was able to simulate the daily water uptake of E. salmonophloia trees with reasonable predictive quality during an entire season. In order to more precisely simulate short-term (i.e. diurnal) water use dynamics, the model must be extended to account for hydraulic and chemical controls of stomatal regulation of crown energy balance.

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