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Increased levels of SNAP-25 and synaptophysin in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in bipolar I disorder

Authors

  • E Scarr,

    1. Rebecca L. Cooper Research Laboratories, The Mental Health Research Institute of Victoria
    2. Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria
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  • L Gray,

    1. Rebecca L. Cooper Research Laboratories, The Mental Health Research Institute of Victoria
    2. Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria
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  • D Keriakous,

    1. Rebecca L. Cooper Research Laboratories, The Mental Health Research Institute of Victoria
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  • PJ Robinson,

    1. Cell Signalling Unit, Children's Medical Research Institute, Wentworthville, NSW
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  • B Dean

    1. Rebecca L. Cooper Research Laboratories, The Mental Health Research Institute of Victoria
    2. Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria
    3. Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne, Parkville
    4. Department of Psychological Medicine, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
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  • The authors of this paper do not have any commercial associations that might pose a conflict of interest in connection with this manuscript.

Dr E. Scarr, Rebecca L. Cooper Research Laboratories, The Mental Health Research Institute of Victoria, Locked Bag 11, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia.
Fax: +61 3 9387 5061;
e-mail: elscarr@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

Objective:  In order to identify whether the mechanisms associated with neurotransmitter release are involved in the pathologies of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, levels of presynaptic [synaptosomal-associated protein-25 (SNAP-25), syntaxin, synaptophysin, vesicle-associated membrane protein, dynamin I] and structural (neuronal cell adhesion molecule and alpha-synuclein) neuronal markers were measured in Brodmann's area 9 obtained postmortem from eight subjects with bipolar I disorder (BPDI), 20 with schizophrenia and 20 controls.

Methods:  Determinations of protein levels were carried out using Western blot techniques with specific antibodies. Levels of mRNA were measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction.

Results:  In BPDI, levels of SNAP-25 (p < 0.01) and synaptophysin (p < 0.05) increased. There were no changes in schizophrenia or any other changes in BPDI. Levels of mRNA for SNAP-25 were decreased in BPDI (p < 0.05).

Conclusion:  Changes in SNAP-25 and synaptophysin in BPDI suggest that changes in specific neuronal functions could be linked to the pathology of the disorder.

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