Metabolic dysfunction in women with bipolar disorder: the potential influence of family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus

Authors

  • Natalie L Rasgon,

    1. Stanford Center for Neuroscience in Women’s Health, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
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  • Heather A Kenna,

    1. Stanford Center for Neuroscience in Women’s Health, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
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  • Margaret F Reynolds-May,

    1. Stanford Center for Neuroscience in Women’s Health, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
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  • Pascale G Stemmle,

    1. Stanford Center for Neuroscience in Women’s Health, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
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  • Mytilee Vemuri,

    1. Stanford Center for Neuroscience in Women’s Health, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
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  • Wendy Marsh,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA
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  • Po Wang,

    1. Bipolar Disorders Clinic, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
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  • Terence A Ketter

    1. Bipolar Disorders Clinic, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
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  • NLR has received grant/research support and/or has been a consultant and/or received lecture honoraria from Abbott Laboratories, Bayer HealthCare, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Forest Laboratories, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, and Wyeth-Ayerst. PW has received grant/research support and/or has been a consultant and/or received lecture honoraria from Abbott Laboratories, AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Cephalon, Eli Lilly & Co., GlaxoSmithKline, Janssen, Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Novartis, Organon, Otsuka, Pfizer, Repligen, Solvay, Valeant Pharmaceuticals, and Vanda Pharmaceuticals. TAK has received grant/research support and/or has been a consultant and/or received lecture honoraria from Abbott Laboratories, AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Cephalon, Eli Lilly & Co., GlaxoSmithKline, Janssen, Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Johnson & Johnson, Novartis, Organon, Otsuka, Pfizer, Repligen, Solvay, Valeant Pharmaceuticals, and Vanda Pharmaceuticals. HAK, MFR-M, PGS, MV, and WM do not have any financial disclosures to report.

Corresponding author:
Natalie L. Rasgon, M.D., Ph.D.
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Stanford University School of Medicine
401 Quarry Road
Stanford, CA 94305-5723, USA
Fax: (650) 724-3144
E-mail: nrasgon@stanford.edu

Abstract

Rasgon NL, Kenna HA, Reynolds-May MF, Stemmle PG, Vemuri M, Marsh W, Wang P, Ketter TA. Metabolic dysfunction in women with bipolar disorder: the potential influence of family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus.
Bipolar Disord 2010: 12: 504–513. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

Objective:  Overweight/obesity, insulin resistance (IR), and other types of metabolic dysfunction are common in patients with bipolar disorder (BD); however, the pathophysiological underpinnings of metabolic dysfunction in BD are not fully understood. Family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (FamHxDM2), which has been shown to have deleterious effects on metabolic function in the general population, may play a role in the metabolic dysfunction observed in BD.

Methods:  Using multivariate analysis of variance, the effects of BD illness and/or FamHxDM2 were examined relative to metabolic biomarkers in 103 women with BD and 36 healthy, age-matched control women.

Results:  As a group, women with BD had higher levels of fasting plasma insulin (FPI) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG), higher homeostatic assessment of IR (HOMA-IR) scores, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and hip circumference (HC) compared to control women. FamHxDM2 was associated with significantly worse metabolic biomarkers among women with BD but not among healthy control women. Among women with BD, there was a significant main effect of FamHxDM2 on FPI, HOMA-IR, BMI, WC, and HC, even after controlling for type of BD illness, duration of medication exposure, and depression severity. Metabolic biomarkers were not influenced by use of weight-liable psychotropic medication (WLM), even after controlling for type of BD illness, duration of medication exposure, and depression severity.

Conclusions:  Women with BD have overall worse metabolic biomarkers than age-matched control women. The use of WLM, duration of medication use, type of BD illness, and depression severity did not appear to be associated with more pronounced metabolic dysfunction. FamHxDM2 may represent a risk factor for the development of IR in women with BD. Further, focused studies of the endocrine profiles of families of BD patients are needed.

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