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The role of disturbed sleep in the early recognition of bipolar disorder: a systematic review

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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Corrigendum Volume 13, Issue 4, 437, Article first published online: June 2011

  • MB has received research support from the Stanley Medical Research Institute and NARSAD; has served as an advisor to AstraZeneca, Eli Lilly & Co., Servier, Janssen-Cilag, Lundbeck, Bristol-Myers Squibb, and Otsuka; and has received speaker fees from AstraZeneca, Eli Lilly & Co., GlaxoSmithKline, Lundbeck, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Otsuka, and Pfizer. KL has received research support from Pfizer; and has received speaker fees from AstraZeneca, Eli Lilly & Co., GlaxoSmithKline, Lundbeck, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Otsuka, Pfizer, and Jansen-Cilag. AP has received research support from GlaxoSmithKline and AstraZeneca; and has received speaker fees from AstraZeneca and Eli Lilly & Co. PSR and CM have no conflicts of interest to report.

Corresponding author:
Philipp S. Ritter, MBBS
Klinik und Poliklinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie
Universitätsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus
Fetscherstrasse 74
01307 Dresden, Germany
Fax: +49-351-458-5380
E-mail: philipp.ritter@uniklinikum-dresden.de

Abstract

Ritter PS, Marx C, Bauer M, Lepold K, Pfennig A. The role of disturbed sleep in the early recognition of bipolar disorder: a systematic review.
Bipolar Disord 2011: 13: 227–237. © 2011 The Authors.
Journal compilation © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

Objectives:  Severely disturbed sleep is known to occur during and shortly prior to the onset of mood episodes in bipolar disorder. Whether alterations in sleep occur parallel and as part of the disease process or whether they represent a trait existent before the onset of the disorder itself remains unclear.

Methods:  A systematic review evaluating all published data on the occurrence of disordered sleep prior to the onset of the first mood episode was conducted.

Results:  The evidence cited within this paper suggests that sleep disturbances frequently precede bipolar disorder by several years and convey an elevated long-term risk for developing any kind of mood disorder. Disordered sleep appears to emerge about the time of puberty and remains persistently elevated in individuals at high risk.

Conclusion:  Disturbed sleep appears to be an early symptom of bipolar disorder but further research, especially longitudinal studies in individuals at high risk, will be required to characterize the type and patterns more precisely.

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