SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

References

  • Agnarsson, I. 2004. Morphological phylogeny of cobweb spiders and their relatives (Araneae, Araneoidea, Theridiidae). Zool. J. Linn. Soc. 141: 447626.
  • Aisenberg, A., Viera, C. & Costa, F.G. 2007. Daring females, devoted males, and reversed sexual size dimorphism in the sand-dwelling spider Allocosa brasiliensis (Araneae, Lycosidae). Behav. Ecol. Sociobiol. 62: 2935.
  • Alexander, R.M. 2003. Principles of Animal Locomotion. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ.
  • Andersson, M. 1994. Sexual Selection. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ.
  • Andrade, M.C.B. 2003. Risky mate search and male self-sacrifice in redback spiders. Behav. Ecol. 14: 531538.
  • Arnedo, M.A., Coddington, J., Agnarsson, I. & Gillespie, R.G. 2004. From a comb to a tree: phylogenetic relationships of the comb-footed spiders (Araneae, Theridiidae) inferred from nuclear and mitochondrial genes. Mol. Phylogenet. Evol. 31: 225245.
  • Autumn, K., Hsieh, S.T., Dudek, D.M., Chen, J., Chitaphan, C. & Full, R.J. 2006. Dynamics of geckos running vertically. J.Exp. Biol. 209: 260272.
  • Bauwens, D., Garland, T., Castilla, A.M. & Van Damme, R. 1995. Evolution of sprint speed in lacertid lizards: morphological, physiological, and behavioral covariation. Evolution 49: 848863.
  • Benjamin, S.R. 2004. Taxonomic revision and phylogenetic hypothesis for the jumping spider subfamily Ballinae (Araneae, Salticidae). Zool. J. Linn. Soc. 142: 182.
  • Blanckenhorn, W.U. 2005. Behavioral causes and consequences of sexual size dimorphism. Ethology 111: 9771016.
  • Brandt, Y. & Andrade, M.C.B. 2007a. Testing the gravity hypothesis of sexual size dimorphism: are small males faster climbers? Funct. Ecol. 21: 379385.
  • Brandt, Y. & Andrade, M.C.B. 2007b. What is the matter with the gravity hypothesis? Funct. Ecol. 21: 11821183.
  • Coddington, J. 2005. Phylogeny and classification of spiders. In: Spiders of North America (D.Ubick, P.Paquin, P.E.Cushing & V.Roth, eds), pp. 1824. American Arachnological Society.
  • Delph, L.F. 2005. Processes that constrain and facilitate the evolution of sexual dimorphism. Am. Nat. 166: S1S4.
  • Diaz-Uriarte, R. & Garland, T. 1998. Effects of branch length errors on the performance of phylogenetically independent contrasts. Syst. Biol. 47: 654672.
  • Diaz-Uriarte, R. & Garland, T. 2007. phylogr: functions for phylogenetically based statistical analyses. Available at: http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/PHYLOGR/index.html (last accessed 5 December 2008).
  • Edwards, R.L. 1996. Estimating live spider weight using preserved specimens. J. Arachnol. 24: 161166.
  • Elgar, M.A. & Fahey, B.F. 1996. Sexual cannibalism, competition, and size dimorphism in the orb-weaving spider Nephila plumipes Latreille (Araneae: Araneoidea). Behav. Ecol. 7: 195198.
  • Fairbairn, D.J. 1997. Allometry for sexual size dimorphism: pattern and process in the coevolution of body size in males and females. Annu. Rev. Ecol. Syst. 28: 659687.
  • Fairbairn, D.J., Blanckenhorn, W.U. & Székely, T. (eds) 2007. Sex, Size and Gender Roles: Evolutionary Studies of Sexual Size Dimorphism. Oxford University Press, Oxford.
  • Foelix, R.F. 1996. Biology of Spiders. Oxford University Press, New York.
  • Foellmer, M.W. & Fairbairn, D.J. 2005. Selection on male size, leg length and condition during mate search in a sexually highly dimorphic orb-weaving spider. Oecologia 142: 653662.
  • Foellmer, M.W. & Moya-Laraño, J. 2007. Sexual size dimorphism in spiders: patterns and processes. In: Sex, Size and Gender Roles: Evolutionary Studies of Sexual Size Dimorphism (D.J.Fairbairn, W.U.Blanckenhorn & T.Székely, eds), pp. 7181. Oxford University Press, Oxford.
  • Full, R.J. & Tu, M.S. 1991. Mechanics of a rapid running insect: two-, four- and six-legged locomotion. J. Exp. Biol. 156: 215231.
  • Full, R.J. & Tullis, A. 1990. Energetics of ascent: insects on inclines. J. Exp. Biol. 149: 307317.
  • Full, R.J., Blickhan, R. & Ting, L.H. 1991. Leg design in hexapedal runners. J. Exp. Biol. 158: 369390.
  • Garland, T., Harvey, P.H. & Ives, A.R. 1992. Procedures for the analysis of comparative data using phylogenetically independent contrasts. Syst. Biol. 41: 1832.
  • Garland, T., Bennett, A.F. & Rezende, E.L. 2005. Phylogenetic approaches in comparative physiology. J. Exp. Biol. 208: 30153035.
  • Ghiselin, M.T. 1974. The Economy of Nature and the Evolution of Sex. University of California Press, Berkeley, CA.
  • Goldman, D.I., Chen, T.S., Dudek, D.M. & Full, R.J. 2006. Dynamics of rapid vertical climbing in cockroaches reveals a template. J. Exp. Biol. 209: 29903000.
  • Head, G. 1995. Selection on fecundity and variation in the degree of sexual size dimorphism among spider species (class Araneae). Evolution 49: 776781.
  • Hill, A.V. 1938. The heat of shortening and the dynamic constants of muscle. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. Ser. B 126: 136195.
  • Hirasaki, E., Kumakura, H. & Matano, S. 2000. Biomechanical analysis of vertical climbing in the Spider Monkey and the Japanese Macaque. Am. J. Physiol. Anthropol. 118: 455472.
  • Hormiga, G., Scharff, N. & Coddington, J.A. 2000. The phylogenetic basis of sexual size dimorphism in orb-weaving spiders (Araneae, Orbiculariae). Syst. Biol. 49: 435462.
  • Josephson, R.K. 1993. Contraction dynamics and power output of skeletal muscle. Annu. Rev. Physiol. 55: 527546.
  • Kasumovic, M.M., Bruce, M.J., Herberstein, M.E. & Andrade, M.C.B. 2007. Risky mate search and mate preference in the golden orb-web spider (Nephila plumipes). Behav. Ecol. 18: 189195.
  • Kingsolver, J.G. 1999. Experimental analyses of wing size, flight, and survival in the western white butterfly. Evolution 53: 14791490.
  • Kupfer, A. 2007. Sexual size dimorphism in amphibians: an overview. In: Sex, Size and Gender Roles: Evolutionary Studies of Sexual Size Dimorphism (D.J.Fairbairn, W.Blanckenhorn & T.Székely, eds), pp. 5059. Oxford University Press, Oxford.
  • Lande, R. 1980. Sexual dimorphism, sexual selection, and adaptation in polygenic characters. Evolution 34: 292305.
  • Linn, C. 2001. The Effect of Male Size on Travel Ability in the Golden Orb-weaving Spider Nephila clavipes: Implications for Sexual Size Dimorphism. Tulane University, New Orleans, LA.
  • Lipp, A., Wolf, H. & Lehmann, F.O. 2005. Walking on inclines: energetics of locomotion in the ant Camponotus. J. Exp. Biol. 208: 707719.
  • Maddison, W.P. & Hedin, M.C. 2003. Jumping spider phylogeny (Araneae : Salticidae). Invertebr. Syst. 17: 529549.
  • Moya-Laraño, J. & Corcobado, G. 2008. Plotting partial regression and correlation in ecological studies. Web Ecol. 8: 3546.
  • Moya-Laraño, J., Halaj, J. & Wise, D.H. 2002. Climbing to reach females: Romeo should be small. Evolution 56: 420425.
  • Moya-Laraño, J., Vinkovic, D., Allard, C.M. & Foellmer, M.W. 2007a. Gravity still matters. Funct. Ecol. 21: 11781181.
  • Moya-Laraño, J., Vinković, D., Allard, C.M. & Foellmer, M.W. 2007b. Mass-mediated sex differences in climbing patterns support the gravity hypothesis of sexual size dimorphism. Web Ecol. 7: 106112.
  • Moya-Laraño, J., Vinković, D., De Mas, E., Corcobado, G. & Moreno, E. 2008. Morphological evolution of spiders predicted by pendulum mechanics. PLoS ONE 3: e1841.
  • Murphy, N.P., Framenau, V.W., Donnellan, S.C., Harvey, M.S., Park, Y.C. & Austin, A.D. 2006. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the wolf spiders (Araneae : Lycosidae) using sequences from the 12S rRNA, 28S rRNA, and NADH1 genes: Implications for classification, biogeography, and the evolution of web building behavior. Mol. Phylogenet. Evol. 38: 583602.
  • Niederegger, S. & Gorb, S.N. 2006. Friction and adhesion in the tarsal and metatarsal scopulae of spiders. J. Comp. Phys. Neuroethol. Sensory Neural Behav. Physiol. 192: 12231232.
  • Peters, R.H. 1983. The Ecological Implications of Body Size. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
  • Peters, H.M. 1990. On the structure and glandular origin of bridging lines used by spiders for moving to distant places. Acta Zool. Fenn. 190: 309314.
  • Platnick, N. 2008. The World Spider Catalog. Version 8.0. Available at: http://research.amnh.org/entomology/spiders/catalog/.
  • Prenter, J., Elwood, R.W. & Montgomery, W.I. 1999. Sexual size dimorphism and reproductive investment by female spiders: a comparative analysis. Evolution 53: 19871994.
  • Quader, S., Isvaran, K., Hale, R.E., Miner, B.G. & Seavy, N.E. 2004. Nonlinear relationships and phylogenetically independent contrasts. J. Evol. Biol. 17: 709715.
  • Rhen, T. 2007. Sex differences: genetic, physiological, and ecological mechanisms. In: Sex, Size and Gender Roles: Evolutionary Studies of Sexual Size Dimorphism (D.J.Fairbairn, W.Blanckenhorn & T.Székely, eds), pp. 167175. Oxford University Press, Oxford.
  • Roberts, T.J., Marsh, R.L., Weyand, P.G. & Taylor, C.R. 1997. Muscular force in running turkeys: the economy of minimizing work. Science 275: 11131115.
  • Scharff, N. & Coddington, J.A. 1997. A phylogenetic analysis of the orb-weaving spider family Araneidae (Arachnida, Araneae). Zool. J. Linn. Soc. 120: 355434.
  • Schneider, J.M. & Elgar, M.A. 2002. Sexual cannibalism in Nephila plumipes as a consequence of female life history strategies. J. Evol. Biol. 15: 8491.
  • Shultz, J.W. 1989. Morphology of locomotor appendages in Arachnida: evolutionary trends and phylogenetic implications. Zool. J. Linn. Soc. 97: 156.
  • Stevenson, R.D. & Josephson, R.K. 1990. Effects of operating frequency and temperature on mechanical power output from moth flight muscle. J. Exp. Biol. 149: 6178.
  • Taylor, C.R., Heglund, N.C. & Maloiy, G.M. 1982. Energetics and mechanics of terrestrial locomotion. I. Metabolic energy consumption as a function of speed and body size in birds and mammals. J. Exp. Biol. 97: 121.
  • Teuschl, Y., Reim, C. & Blanckenhorn, W.U. 2007. Correlated responses to artificial body size selection in growth, development, phenotypic plasticity and juvenile viability in yellow dung flies. J. Evol. Biol. 20: 87103.
  • Vollrath, F. 1980. Male body size and fitness in the web-building spider Nephila clavipes. Z. Tierpsychol. 53: 6178.
  • Vollrath, F. 1998. Dwarf males. Trends Ecol. Evol. 13: 159163.
  • Vollrath, F. & Parker, G.A. 1992. Sexual dimorphism and distorted sex ratios in spiders. Nature 360: 156159.
  • Wickler, S.J., Hoyt, D.F., Cogger, E.A. & Hirschbein, M.H. 2000. Preferred speed and cost of transport: the effect of incline. J. Exp. Biol. 203: 21952200.
  • Zaaf, A., Van Damme, R., Herrel, A. & Aerts, P. 2001. Spatio-temporal gait characteristics of level and vertical locomotion in a ground-dwelling and a climbing gecko. J. Exp. Biol. 204: 12331246.