SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

References

  • Alfaro, M.E., Karns, D.R., Voris, H.K., Brock, C.D. & Stuart, B.L. 2008. Phylogeny, evolutionary history, and biogeography of Oriental–Australian rear-fanged water snakes (Colubroidea: Homalopsidae) inferred from mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences. Mol. Phyl. Evol. 46: 579593.
  • Boulenger, G.A. 1893. Snakes in the British Museum (Natural History). Vol I. Typhlopidae, Glauconiidae, Boidae, Ilysiidae, Uropeltidae, Xenopeltidae, and Colubridae aglyphae. Taylor and Francis, London.
  • Boulenger, G.A. 1894. Snakes in the British Museum (Natural History). Vol II. Containing the conclusion of Colubridae aglyphae. Taylor and Francis, London.
  • Boulenger, G.A. 1896. Catalogue of the snakes in the British Museum (Natural History). Vol III. Containing the Colubridae (opisthoglyphae and proteroglyphae), Amblycephalidae, and Viperidae. Taylor and Francis, London.
  • Caprette, C., Lee, M.S.Y., Shine, R., Mokany, A. & Downhower, J.F. 2004. The origin of snakes (Serpentes) as seen through eye anatomy. Biol. J. Linn. Soc. 81: 469482.
  • Cogger, H.G., Cameron, E.E., Sadlier, R.A. & Eggler, P. 1993. The action plan for Australian reptiles. Australian Nature Conservation Agency, Canberra, A.C.T.
  • Crawford, S.C. 1934. The Habits and Characteristics of Nocturnal Animals. Quart. Rev. Biol. 9: 201214.
  • Detwiler, S.R. 1955. The eye and its structural adaptation. Proc. Am. Phil. Soc. 99: 224238.
  • Fontenot, C.L. Jr 2008. Variation in pupil diameter in North American Gartersnakes (Thamnophis) is regulated by immersion in water, not by light intensity. Vis. Res. 48: 16631669.
  • Goodyear, S.E. & Pianka, E.R. 2008. Sympatric Ecology of Five Species of Fossorial Snakes (Elapidae) in Western Australia. J. Herpetol. 42: 279285.
  • Greene, H.W. 1997. Snakes: The Evolution of Mystery in Nature. University of California Press, Berkeley, CA.
  • Heath, J.E., Northcutt, R.G. & Barber, R.P. 1969. Rotational optokinesis in reptiles and its bearing on pupillary shape. Z. Vergl. Physiol. 62: 7585.
  • Henderson, R.W. & Binder, M.H. 1980. The ecology and behavior of vine snakes (Ahaetulla, Oxybelis, Thelotornis, Uromacer): a review. Mil. Pub. Mus. Cont. Biol. Geol. 37: 138.
  • Henry, D. 1986. Red Fox: The Catlike Canine. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, D.C.
  • Hermann, L.M., Peacock, M.F., Yunker, M.P. & Madsen, C.J. 1975. Bottlenosed dolphin: double slit pupil yields equivalent aerial and underwater visual acuity. Science 189: 650652.
  • Ineich, I., Bonnet, X., Shine, R., Shine, T., Brischoux, F., LeBreton, M. & Chirio, L. 2006. What, if anything, is a “typical viper”? Biological attributes of basal viperid snakes (genus Causus, Wagler 1830) Biol. J. Linn. Soc. 89: 575588.
  • Kelly, C.M.R., Barker, N.P. & Villet, M.H. 2003. Phylogenetics of Advanced Snakes (Caenophidia) Based on Four Mitochondrial Genes. Syst. Biol. 52: 439459.
  • Keogh, J.S., Scott, I.A.W., Fitzgerald, M. & Shine, R. 2003. Molecular phylogeny of the Australian venomous snake genus Hoplocephalus (Serpentes, Elapidae) and conservation genetics of the threatened H. stephensii. Conserv. Genet. 4: 5765.
  • Kröger, R.H.H., Campbell, M.C.V., Fernald, R.D. & Wagner, H.J. 1999. Multifocal lenses compensate for chromatic defocus in vertebrate eyes. J. Comp. Physiol. A 184: 361369.
  • Llewelyn, J., Shine, R. & Webb, J.K. 2005. Thermal regime and diel activity patterns of four species of small elapid snakes from south-eastern Australia. Aust. J. Zool. 53: 18.
  • Maddison, W.P. & Maddison, D.R. 2009. Mesquite: a modular system for evolutionary analysis. Version 2.6. http://mesquiteproject.org .
  • Malmström, T. & Kröger, R.H.H. 2006. Pupil shapes and lens optics in the eyes of terrestrial vertebrates. J. Exp. Biol. 209: 1825.
  • McDowell, S.B. 1969. Notes on the Australian sea-snake Ephalophis greyi M. Smith (Serpentes: Elapidae, Hydrophiinae) and the origin and classification of sea-snakes. Zool. J. Linn. Soc. 48: 333349.
  • McDowell, S.B. 1970. On the status and relationships of the Solomon Island elapid snakes. J. Zool. 161: 145190.
  • Midford, P. & Maddison, W. 2009. Pagel’s 1994 Correlation method. Mesquite Manual. http://mesquiteproject.org.
  • Murphy, C.J. & Howland, H.C. 1986. On the gekko pupil and Scheiner’s disc. Vis. Res. 26: 815817.
  • Murphy, C.J. & Howland, H.C. 1990. The functional significance of crescent-shaped pupils and multiple pupillary apertures. J. Exp. Zool. 5: 2228.
  • Murray, D.L., Boutin, S., O’Donoghue, M. & Nams, V.O. 1995. Hunting behaviour of a sympatric felid and canid in relation to vegetative cover. Anim. Behav. 50: 12031210.
  • Myers, C.W. 1984. Subcircular Pupil Shape in the Snake Tantalophis (Colubridae). Copeia 1984: 215216.
  • O’Shea, M. 1996. A guide to the snakes of Papua New Guinea. Independent Publishing, Madang.
  • Pagel, M. 1994. Detecting correlated evolution on phylogenies: a general model for the comparative analysis of discrete characters. Proc. R. Soc. B. 255: 3745.
  • Rawlings, L.H., Robosky, D.L., Donellan, S.C. & Hutchison, M.N. 2008. Python phylogenetics: inference from morphology and mitochondrial DNA. Biol. J. Linn. Soc. 93: 603619.
  • Reed, R.N. & Shine, R. 2002. Lying in wait for extinction: ecological correlates of conservation status among Australian elapid snakes. Conserv. Biol. 16: 451461.
  • Reilly, S.M., McBrayer, L.B. & Miles, D.B. 2007. Lizard Ecology: The Evolutionary Consequences of Foraging Mode. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
  • Rodha, G.H. 1992. Foraging behaviour of the brown tree snake, Boiga irregularis. J. Herpetol. 2: 110114.
  • Sanders, K.L., Lee, M.S.Y., Leys, R., Foster, R. & Keogh, J.S. 2008. Molecular phylogeny and divergence dates for Australasian elapids and sea snakes (hydrophiinae): evidence from seven genes for rapid evolutionary radiations. Evol. Biol. 21: 682695.
  • Scanlon, J.D. 2003. The Australian elapid genus Cacophis: morphology and phylogeny of rainforest crowned snakes. Herpetol. J. 13: 120.
  • Scanlon, J.D. & Lee, M.S.Y. 2004. Phylogeny of Australasian venomous snakes (Colubroidea, Elapidae, Hydrophiinae) based on phenotypic and molecular evidence. Zool. Scr. 33: 335367.
  • Shine, R. 1979. Activity patterns in Australian elapid snakes (Squamata: Serpentes: Elapidae). Herpetol. 35: 111.
  • Shine, R. 1980a. Reproduction, feeding and growth in the Australian burrowing snake Vermicella annulata. J. Herpetol. 14: 7177.
  • Shine, R. 1980b. Comparative ecology of three Australian snake species of the genus Cacophis (Serpentes: Elapidae). Copeia 1980: 831838.
  • Shine, R. 1980c. Ecology of eastern Australian whipsnakes of the genus Demansia. J. Herpetol. 14: 381389.
  • Shine, R. 1980d. Ecology of the Australian death adder, Acanthophis antarcticus (Elapidae): evidence for convergence with the Viperidae. Herpetol. 36: 281289.
  • Shine, R. 1981a. Venomous snakes in cold climates: ecology of the Australian genus Drysdalia (Serpentes: Elapidae). Copeia 1981: 1425.
  • Shine, R. 1981b. Ecology of the Australian elapid snakes of the genera Furina and Glyphodon. J. Herpetol. 15: 219224.
  • Shine, R. 1982. Ecology of an Australian elapid snake, Echiopsis curta. J. Herpetol. 16: 388393.
  • Shine, R. 1983a. Arboreality in snakes: ecology of the Australian elapid genus Hoplocephalus. Copeia 1983: 198205.
  • Shine, R. 1983b. Food habits and reproductive biology of Australian elapid snakes of the genus Denisonia. J. Herpetol. 17: 171175.
  • Shine, R. 1984a. Ecology of small fossorial Australian snakes of the genera Neelaps and Simoselaps (Serpentes, Elapidae). Univ. Kansas Mus. Nat. Hist. 10: 173183.
  • Shine, R. 1984b. Reproductive biology and food habits of the Australian elapid snakes of the genus Cryptophis. J. Herpetol. 18: 3339.
  • Shine, R. 1986a. Sexual differences in morphology and niche utilization in an aquatic snake, Acrochordus arafurae. Oecologia 69: 260267.
  • Shine, R. 1986b. Natural history of two monotypic snake genera of southwestern Australia, Elapognathus and Rhinoplocephalus (Elapidae). J. Herpetol. 20: 436439.
  • Shine, R. 1987a. Food habits and reproductive biology of Australian snakes of the genus Hemiaspis (Elapidae). J. Herpetol. 21: 7174.
  • Shine, R. 1987b. Intraspecific variation in thermoregulation, movements and habitat use by Australian blacksnakes, Pseudechis porphyriacus (Elapidae). J. Herpetol. 21: 165177.
  • Shine, R. 1988. Food habits and reproductive biology of small Australian snakes of the genera Unechis and Suta (Serpentes, Elapidae). J. Herpetol. 22: 307315.
  • Shine, R. 1991. Strangers in a strange land: ecology of the Australian colubrid snakes. Copeia 1991: 120131.
  • Shine, R. & Charles, N. 1982. Ecology of the Australian elapid snake Tropidechis carinatus. J. Herpetol. 16: 383387.
  • Shine, R. & Covacevich, J. 1983. Ecology of highly venomous snakes: the Australian genus Oxyuranus (Elapidae). J. Herpetol. 17: 6069.
  • Shine, R. & Sun, L. 2003. Attack strategy of an ambush predator: which attributes of the prey trigger a pit-viper’s strike? Funct. Ecol. 17: 340348.
  • Shine, R., Brown, G.P. & Elphick, M.J. 2004a. Field experiments on foraging in free-ranging water snakes Enhydris polylepis (Homalopsinae). Anim. Behav. 68: 13131324.
  • Shine, R., Bonnet, X., Elphick, M. & Barrott, E. 2004b. A novel foraging mode in snakes: browsing by the sea snake Emydocephalus annulatus (Serpentes, Hydrophiidae). Funct. Ecol. 18: 1624.
  • Slip, D.J. & Shine, R. 1988a. Feeding habits of the diamond python, Morelia s. spilota: ambush predation by a boid snake. J. Herpetol. 22: 323330.
  • Slip, D.J. & Shine, R. 1988b. Habitat use, movements and activity patterns of free-ranging diamond pythons, Morelia s. spilota (Serpentes: Boidae): a radiotelemetric study. Aust. Wild Res. 15: 515531.
  • Somaweera, R. 2006. Sri lankawe sarpayin (‘The Snakes of Sri Lanka’). Wildlife Heritage Trust of Sri Lanka, Colombo.
  • Storr, G.M., Smith, L.A. & Johnstone, R.E. 2002. Snakes of western Australia. Western Australian Museum, Perth, WA.
  • Sunquist, M.E. & Sunquist, F.C. 1989. Ecological constraints on predation by large felids. In: Carnivore Behavior. Ecolopv and Evolution (J.L.Gittleman, ed), pp. 283301. Cornell University Press, Ithaca, New York.
  • Swanson, S. 2007. Field Guide to Australian Reptiles. Steve Parish Publishing, Brisbane.
  • Underwood, G. 1951. Pupil shape in certain gekkos. Copeia 3: 211212.
  • Vidal, N., Delmas, A.S., David, P., Cruaud, C., Couloux, A. & Hedges, S.B. 2007. The phylogeny and classification of caenophidian snakes inferred from seven nuclear protein-coding genes. C. R. Biol. 330: 182187.
  • Waite, E.R. 1929. The reptiles and amphibians of South Australia Book. H. Weir, Govt. Printer, Adelaide.
  • Wall, M. & Shine, R. 2007. Dangerous prey: how do snake-like lizards (Lialis burtonis Gray, Pygopodidae) subdue their lizard prey? Biol. J. Linn. Soc. 91: 719727.
  • Walls, G.L. 1940. Ophthalmological Implications for the Early History of the Snakes. Copeia 1940: 18.
  • Walls, G.L. 1942. The Vertebrate Eye and its Adaptive Radiation. The Cranbrook Institute of Science, Bloomington Hills Michigan.
  • Weigel, J.R. 1990. The Australian Reptile Park’s guide to the snakes of south-east Australia. Australian Reptile Park, Gosford, NSW.
  • Werner, Y.L. 1967. Dark Adaptation of the Vertical Pupil in a Snake. Herpetol. 23: 6263.
  • Wüster, W., Dumbrell, A.J., Hay, C., Pook, C.E., Williams, D.J. & Fry, B.G. 2005. Snakes across the Strait: trans-Torresian phylogeographic relationships in three genera of Australasian snakes (Serpentes: Elapidae: Acantophis, Oxyuranus, and Pseudechis). Mol. Phyl. Evol. 34: 114.
  • Zusi, R.L. & Bridge, D. 1981. On the Slit Pupil of the Black Skimmer (Rynchops niger). J. Field Ornithol. 52: 338340.