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Proteomics applied to transfusion plasma: the beginning of the story

Authors

  • A. Ortiz,

    1. USR CNRS 3290, Miniaturisation pour la Synthèse, l’Analyse et la Protéomique (MSAP) et IFR 147, Protéomique, Modification Post-traductionnelles et Glycobiologie, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologie, Villeneuve d’Ascq, France
    2. Établissement Français du Sang Nord de France, Lille, France
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  • L. Richa,

    1. USR CNRS 3290, Miniaturisation pour la Synthèse, l’Analyse et la Protéomique (MSAP) et IFR 147, Protéomique, Modification Post-traductionnelles et Glycobiologie, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologie, Villeneuve d’Ascq, France
    2. Établissement Français du Sang Nord de France, Lille, France
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  • C. Defer,

    1. Établissement Français du Sang Nord de France, Lille, France
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  • D. Dernis,

    1. Établissement Français du Sang Nord de France, Lille, France
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  • J.-J. Huart,

    1. Établissement Français du Sang Nord de France, Lille, France
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  • C. Tokarski,

    1. USR CNRS 3290, Miniaturisation pour la Synthèse, l’Analyse et la Protéomique (MSAP) et IFR 147, Protéomique, Modification Post-traductionnelles et Glycobiologie, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologie, Villeneuve d’Ascq, France
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  • C. Rolando

    1. USR CNRS 3290, Miniaturisation pour la Synthèse, l’Analyse et la Protéomique (MSAP) et IFR 147, Protéomique, Modification Post-traductionnelles et Glycobiologie, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologie, Villeneuve d’Ascq, France
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Christian Rolando, Université des Sciences et Technologies de Lille 1, Bâtiment C4, Avenue Paul Langevin, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex, France
E-mail: christian.rolando@univ-lille1.fr

Abstract

‘Safe blood’ is and has always been the major concern in transfusion medicine. Plasma can undergo virus inactivation treatments based on physicochemical, photochemical or thermal methodologies for pathogen inactivation. The validation of these treatments is essentially based on clottability assays and clotting factors’ titration; however, their impact on plasma proteins at the molecular level has not yet been evaluated. Proteomics appears as particularly adapted to identify, to localize and, consequently, to correlate these modifications to the biological activity change. At the crossroads of biology and analytical sciences, proteomics is the large-scale study of proteins in tissues, physiological fluids or cells at a given moment and in a precise environment. The proteomic strategy is based on a set of methodologies involving separative techniques like mono- and bidimensional gel electrophoresis and chromatography, analytical techniques, especially mass spectrometry, and bioinformatics. Even if plasma has been extensively studied since the very beginning of proteomics, its application to transfusion medicine has just begun. In the first part of this review, we present the principles of proteomics analysis. Then, we propose a state of the art of proteomics applied to plasma analysis. Finally, the use of proteomics for the evaluation of the impact of storage conditions and pathogen inactivation treatments applied to transfusion plasma and for the evaluation of therapeutic protein fractionated is discussed.

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