Do wound complications or lymphoceles occur more often in solid organ transplant recipients on mTOR inhibitors? A systematic review of randomized controlled trials

Authors

  • Liset H. M. Pengel,

    1. Centre for Evidence in Transplantation, Clinical Effectiveness Unit, Royal College of Surgeons of England and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, University of London, London, UK
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  • Liang Q. Liu,

    1. Centre for Evidence in Transplantation, Clinical Effectiveness Unit, Royal College of Surgeons of England and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, University of London, London, UK
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  • Peter J. Morris

    1. Centre for Evidence in Transplantation, Clinical Effectiveness Unit, Royal College of Surgeons of England and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, University of London, London, UK
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  • Conflicts of Interest
    PJM chairs a data safety committee for Bristol-Meyers Squibb and has in the past received lecture fees from Novartis, Astellas, Roche and Genzyme.

Liset HM Pengel PhD, Centre for Evidence in Transplantation, Royal College of Surgeons of England, 35-43 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PE, UK. Tel.: +44 20 7869 6627; fax: +44 20 7869 6644; e-mail: lpengel@rcseng.ac.uk

Summary

mTOR inhibitors have been associated with wound complications and lymphoceles. We systematically reviewed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to compare these outcomes for solid organ transplant recipients. Relevant medical databases were searched to identify RCTs in solid organ transplantation comparing mTOR inhibitors with an alternative therapy reporting on wound complications and/or lymphoceles. Methodological quality of RCTs was assessed. Pooled analyses were performed to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Thirty-seven RCTs in kidney, heart, simultaneous pancreas-kidney and liver transplantation were included. Pooled analyses showed a higher incidence of wound complications (OR 1.77, CI 1.31–2.37) and lymphoceles (OR 2.07, CI 1.62–2.65) for kidney transplant recipients on mTOR inhibitors together with calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs). There was also a higher incidence of wound complications (OR 3.00, CI 1.61–5.59) and lymphoceles (OR 2.13, CI 1.57–2.90) for kidney transplant recipients on mTOR inhibitors together with antimetabolites. Heart transplant patients receiving mTOR inhibitors together with CNIs also reported more wound complications (OR 1.82, CI 1.15–2.87). We found a higher incidence of wound complications and lymphoceles after kidney transplantation and a higher incidence of wound complications after heart transplantation for immunosuppressive regimens that included mTOR inhibitors from the time of transplantation.

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