Homeless networks and geographic concentration: Evidence from Osaka City

Authors

  • Shinichiro Iwata,

    1. Faculty of Economics, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan
      (e-mail: iwata@eco.u-toyama.ac.jp, kkarato@eco.u-toyama.ac.jp)
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    • The authors are grateful to two anonymous referees, Masahiro Ashiya, Mototsugu Fukushige, Tatsuo Hatta, Nobuhiro Hosoe, Tatsuhiko Kawashima, Kazuyuki Nakamura, Toru Mizuuchi, Ryosuke Okamoto, Fumio Takuma, Komei Sasaki, Takatoshi Tabuchi, Piyush Tiwari, Hiroyuki Yamada, Mitsuyoshi Yanagihara and seminar participants at Nagoya University, GRIPS, the JEA conference in Fukushima, AsRES/AREUEA conference in Vancouver, and ARSC conference in Hiroshima for their useful suggestions that have helped us to improve our paper considerably. The authors would also like to thank Toru Mizuuchi, Yuji Okura, and Wataru Suzuki for the data used, Takuya Obara and Shohei Usami for technical assistance. All remaining errors are the sole responsibility of the authors. Part of this paper was written while Shinichiro Iwata was visiting CIRJE, University of Tokyo, and Department of Urban Studies, University of Glasgow. He gratefully acknowledges the hospitality of these institutions. This research was supported by KAKENHI (17730159).

  • Koji Karato

    1. Faculty of Economics, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555, Japan
      (e-mail: iwata@eco.u-toyama.ac.jp, kkarato@eco.u-toyama.ac.jp)
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Abstract

Abstract

Homeless people in Osaka City are geographically concentrated. The purpose of this paper is to empirically test the hypothesis that the geographic concentration arises from the benefits of homeless networks. A spatial regression model is estimated using data on Osaka City's homeless population by census blocks. The positive coefficient of the spatially lagged dependent variable enables us to explore how a homeless network across census blocks, outweighs a negative competition effect. The estimated results indicate that homeless networks exist in homeless societies.

Resumen

Las personas sin hogar se concentran de manera geográfica en la ciudad de Osaka. El propósito de este artículo es probar empíricamente la hipótesis de que la concentración geográfica proviene de los beneficios de redes de personas sin hogar. Se estima un modelo de regresión espacial que utiliza datos de la población de personas sin hogar en la ciudad de Osaka para bloques censuales. El coeficiente positivo de la variable dependiente con desfase espacial nos permite explorar el modo en que una red de personas sin hogar en bloques censuales pesa más que el efecto negativo de la competencia. Los resultados estimados indican que las redes de personas sin hogar existen en sociedades que crean personas sin techo.

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