MYB72, a node of convergence in induced systemic resistance triggered by a fungal and a bacterial beneficial microbe

Authors

  • G. Segarra,

    1.  Departament de Biologia Vegetal, Facultat de Biologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
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    • *

      These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • S. Van der Ent,

    1.  Graduate School Experimental Plant Sciences, Plant–Microbe Interactions, Institute of Environmental Biology, Faculty of Science,  Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • I. Trillas,

    1.  Departament de Biologia Vegetal, Facultat de Biologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
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  • C. M. J. Pieterse

    1.  Graduate School Experimental Plant Sciences, Plant–Microbe Interactions, Institute of Environmental Biology, Faculty of Science,  Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
    2.  Center for Biosystems Genomics, Wageningen, The Netherlands
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  • Editor
    H. Papen

C. M. J. Pieterse, Section Plant–Microbe Interactions, Institute of Environmental Biology, Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht, The Netherlands.
E-mail: C.M.J.Pieterse@uu.nl

Abstract

Colonisation of plant roots by selected beneficial Trichoderma fungi or Pseudomonas bacteria can result in the activation of a systemic defence response that is effective against a broad spectrum of pathogens. In Arabidopsis thaliana, induced systemic resistance (ISR) triggered by the rhizobacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS417r is regulated by a jasmonic acid- and ethylene-dependent defence signalling pathway. Jasmonic acid and ethylene also play a role in Trichoderma-induced resistance. To further investigate the similarities between rhizobacteria- and Trichoderma-induced resistance, we studied the response of Arabidopsis to root colonisation by Trichoderma asperellum T34. In many aspects T34-ISR was similar to WCS417r-ISR. First, colonisation of the roots by T34 rendered the leaves more resistant to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, the biotrophic oomycete Hyaloperonospora parasitica and the necrotrophic fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina. Second, treatment of the roots with T34 primed the leaf tissue for enhanced jasmonic acid-responsive gene expression and increased formation of callose-containing papillae upon pathogen attack. Third, T34-ISR was fully expressed in the salicylic acid impaired mutant sid2, but blocked in the defence regulatory mutant npr1. Finally, we show that the root-specific transcription factor MYB72, which is essential in early signalling steps of WCS417r-ISR, is also required for T34-ISR. Together, these results indicate that the defence pathways triggered by beneficial Trichoderma and Pseudomonas spp. strains are highly similar and that MYB72 functions as an early node of convergence in the signalling pathways that are induced by these different beneficial microorganisms.

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