Get access

Distinct modes of adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis thaliana

Authors

  • L. da Rocha Correa,

    1.  Departamento de Botânica, Laboratório de Fisiologia Vegetal, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Botânica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, Brazil
    Search for more papers by this author
  • J. Troleis,

    1.  Departamento de Botânica, Laboratório de Anatomia Vegetal, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Botânica, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, Brazil
    Search for more papers by this author
  • A. A. Mastroberti,

    1.  Departamento de Botânica, Laboratório de Anatomia Vegetal, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Botânica, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, Brazil
    Search for more papers by this author
  • J. E. A. Mariath,

    1.  Departamento de Botânica, Laboratório de Anatomia Vegetal, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Botânica, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, Brazil
    Search for more papers by this author
  • A. G. Fett-Neto

    1.  Departamento de Botânica, Laboratório de Fisiologia Vegetal, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Botânica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, Brazil
    2.  Centro de Biotecnologia (Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia Celular e Molecular), UFRGS, Porto Alegre, Brazil
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Editor
    A. Amtmann

A. G. Fett-Neto, Centro de Biotecnologia (Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia Celular e Molecular), UFRGS, CP 15005, CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.
E-mail: fettneto@cbiot.ufrgs.br

Abstract

The literature describes different rooting protocols for Arabidopsis thaliana as models to study adventitious rooting, and results are generally perceived as comparable. However, there is a lack of investigations focusing on the distinct features, advantages and limitations of each method in the study of adventitious rooting with both wild-type (WT) ecotypes and their respective mutants. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate the adventitious rooting process in three different experimental systems, all using A. thaliana, analysing the same rooting parameters after transient exposure to auxin (indole-3-acetic acid) and control conditions: excised leaves, de-rooted plants and etiolated seedlings. The founding tissues and sites of origin of roots differed depending on the system used, whereas all rooting patterns were of the direct type (i.e., without callus formation). None of the systems had an absolute requirement for exogenous auxin, although rooting was enhanced by this phytohormone, with the exception of de-rooted plants, which had adventitious rooting strongly inhibited by exogenous auxin. Root elongation was much favoured in isolated leaves. Auxin-overproducing mutants could not be used in the detached leaf system due to precocious senescence; in the de-rooted plant system, these mutants had a WT-like rooting response, whereas the expression of the ‘rooty’ phenotype was only evident in the etiolated seedling system. Adventitious rooting of etiolated WT seedlings in the presence of exogenous auxin was inhibited by exogenous flavonoids, which act as auxin transport inhibitors; surprisingly, the flavonoid-deficient mutant chs had a lower rooting response compared to WT. Although Arabidopsis is an excellent model system to study adventitious rooting, physiological and developmental responses differed significantly, underlining the importance of avoiding data generalisation on rooting responses derived from different experimental systems with this species.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary