Bacillus thuringiensis protein transfer between rootstock and scion of grafted poplar

Authors

  • L. Wang,

    1.  Institute of Forest Biotechnology, Forestry College, Agricultural University of Hebei, Baoding, China
    2.  College of Horticulture, Hebei North University, Zhangjiakou, China
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  • M. Yang,

    1.  Institute of Forest Biotechnology, Forestry College, Agricultural University of Hebei, Baoding, China
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  • A. Akinnagbe,

    1.  Institute of Forest Biotechnology, Forestry College, Agricultural University of Hebei, Baoding, China
    2.  Department of Forestry & Wood Technology, Federal University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria
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  • H. Liang,

    1.  Institute of Forest Biotechnology, Forestry College, Agricultural University of Hebei, Baoding, China
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  • J. Wang,

    1.  Institute of Forest Biotechnology, Forestry College, Agricultural University of Hebei, Baoding, China
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  • D. Ewald

    1.  Institute of Forest Genetics, Johann Heinrich von Thuenen Institute Federal Research Institute for Rural Areas, Forestry and Fisheries, Waldsieversdorf, Germany
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  • Editor
    P. Franken

M. Yang, Institute of Forest Biotechnology, Forestry College, Agricultural University of Hebei, 071000 Baoding, China.
E-mail: deu100@yahoo.com.cn

Abstract

Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry1Ac protein is a toxin against different leaf-eating lepidopteran insects that attack poplar trees. In the present study, the mode of migration of the Bt-Cry1Ac protein within poplar grafts was investigated. Grafting was done using Pb29 (transgenic poplar 741 with cry1Ac genes), CC71 (transgenic poplar 741 with cry3A genes), non-transgenic poplar 741 and non-transgenic Populus tomentosa, either as scion or as rootstock. In order to detect migration of Bt-Cry1Ac protein from one portion of the graft union to different tissues in the grafted plant, ELISA analysis was employed to assess the content of Bt-Cry1Ac protein in the phloem, xylem, pith and leaves of the grafted poplar. To further verify migration of Bt-Cry1Ac protein, Clostera anachoreta larvae, which are susceptible to Bt-Cry1Ac protein, were fed leaves from the control graft (i.e., graft portion that originally did not contain Bt-Cry1Ac protein). The results showed that Bt-Cry1Ac protein was transported between rootstock and scion mainly through the phloem. Migration of Bt-Cry1Ac protein in the grafted union was also evidenced in that the leaves of the control graft did have a lethal effect on C. anachoreta larvae in laboratory feeding experiments.

Ancillary