Abundance and spatial distribution of aphids and scales select for different life histories in their ladybird beetle predators

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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Abundance and spatial distribution of aphids and scales select for different life histories in their ladybird beetle predators Volume 130, Issue 8, 461–464, Article first published online: 30 August 2006

Author's address: I. Borges (corresponding author), Departamento de Biologia, Universidade dos Açores, Rua Mãe de Deus 13–A, Apartado 1422, 9501-801 Ponta Delgada, Portugal, E-mail: isabelborges@notes.uac.pt

Abstract

Abstract:  Life history parameters tend to differ between aphidophagous and coccidophagous ladybird beetles. It seems that the nature of prey, in particular the abundance, number and size of the colonies and their spatial distribution, may have been selected for the evolution of the life histories in these two groups of coccinellids, leading the aphidophagous ladybird beetles to develop at a fast pace and the coccidophagous beetles at a slower pace. To study the abundance, number and size of the colonies and the spatial distribution of aphid and coccid species, 100 sampling plots regularly spaced along four parallel transects were surveyed in the summer of 2004. At each sampling plot, species abundance, and the number and size of colonies of aphid and coccid species were recorded. Iwao's patchiness regression was used to assess the spatial distribution of aphids and coccids. From this study, it was found that coccids are much rarer than aphids but formed more colonies. Whereas aphids display a stonger tendency to crowding, aphid colonies are randomly distributed in space while coccid groups are aggregated. So, it seems that the abundance and spatial distribution of prey distribution may be factors selecting for the evolution of different life histories among aphidophagous and coccidophagous ladybird beetles.

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