Tinea incognito due to Trichophyton mentagrophytes

Authors

  • María Elena Sánchez-Castellanos,

    1. Departments of Paediatric Dermatology, Dermatopathology and Micology, Instituto Dermatológico de Jalisco ‘Dr. José Barba Rubio’, Zapopan, Jalisco, México
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  • Jorge Arturo Mayorga-Rodríguez,

    1. Departments of Paediatric Dermatology, Dermatopathology and Micology, Instituto Dermatológico de Jalisco ‘Dr. José Barba Rubio’, Zapopan, Jalisco, México
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  • Cecilia Sandoval-Tress,

    1. Departments of Paediatric Dermatology, Dermatopathology and Micology, Instituto Dermatológico de Jalisco ‘Dr. José Barba Rubio’, Zapopan, Jalisco, México
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  • Mercedes Hernández-Torres

    1. Departments of Paediatric Dermatology, Dermatopathology and Micology, Instituto Dermatológico de Jalisco ‘Dr. José Barba Rubio’, Zapopan, Jalisco, México
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Cecilia Sandoval-Tress, Caracol No. 2840 Colonia Verde Valle 44550, Guadalajara, Jalisco, México.
Tel.: +52 33 31 21 06 40. Fax: +52 33 30 30 45 50.
E-mail: cecytress@hotmail.com

Summary

Tinea incognito is a ringworm infection modified by corticosteroids. We report a case of a 2-year-old girl who developed tinea incognito due to Trichophyton mentagrophytes after applying methylprednisolone aceponate for 3 months. Diagnosis was confirmed by histopathologic and mycological examination, which led to the identification of Trichophyton mentagrophytes var. mentagrophytes, a zoophilic dermatophyte. Previous corticosteroid use in dermatophyte infections can alter their clinical appearance leading to misdiagnosis and delay in appropriate therapy.

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