Translation of the human genome into clinical allergy, part 2

Authors

  • Hirohisa Saito

    1. Department of Allergy and Immunology, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development and Laboratory for Allergy Transcriptome at RIKEN Research Center for Allergy and Immunology, Tokyo, Japan
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Dr Hirohisa Saito, Director, Department of Allergy and Immunology, National Research Institute for Child Health & Development and Laboratory for Allergy Transcriptome at RIKEN Research Center for Allergy & Immunology, 3-35-31 Taishido, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 154-8567, Japan. Email: hsaito@nch.go.jp

Abstract

After completion of sequencing of the human genome, you will no longer be able to discover a new gene and may not be able to find a new molecule in the human body. Instead, you may find many new molecule networks. It will be possible to select information obtained from animal models just where orthologous genes are functioning similarly. Mouse disease models will not be used any longer where key orthologous genes are working differently than in humans. Analysis of cell type-selective transcripts from database searches is now available to minimize the efforts required for drug discovery. As such, it will soon be possible to use computational modeling to analyze integrative biological function and to test hypotheses without performing any in vivo or in vitro experimentation. However, before establishing a system simulating the human body, which consists of a variety of organs, which further consist of various types of cells, which then consist of various types of proteins, which consist of 20 types of amino acids, there are many steps that need to be understood.

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