Source and content of health information for patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy

Authors

  • Nicole Blay RN BHA,

    Corresponding author
    1. Senior Nurse Manager, Acute Care Nursing Research Professorial Unit, The St George Hospital, Kogarah, New South Wales, Australia
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  • Judith Donoghue RN PhD

    1. Professor, Acute Care Nursing Research, The St George Hospital, Kogarah, and Professor of Acute Care Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Health, The University of Technology, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
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Nicole Blay, ACNRPU, 1st floor James Laws House, The St. George Hospital, Gray Street, Kogarah, NSW 2217, Australia. Email: blayn@sesiahs.nsw.gov.au

Abstract

This study, a component of a larger research project examining the effect of pre-admission education on patients’ ability and confidence in domiciliary self-care following laparoscopic cholecystectomy, identified the source(s) of specific health- and hospital-related information for patients undergoing this operative procedure. One-hundred laparoscopic cholecystectomy patients were surveyed at pre-admission, following assessment by the pre-admission nurse, anaesthetist and registered medical officer to determine what information had been provided by the pre-admission nurse and/or alternative sources of information provision. The findings showed that laparoscopic cholecystectomy patients received information from multiple sources. Pre-admission clinic nurses were more likely to provide information related to the surgical procedure and hospital length of stay than about postoperative expectations and self-care. Overall, patients perceived that medical practitioners imparted the most information. Printed literature and informal channels of information provision featured strongly, indicating patients’ resourcefulness in obtaining information related to their surgery. Informal communication showed the importance of social networks and personal experience in aiding patients’ comprehension of the hospital and recovery experience.

Ancillary