Reducing admission times in the endoscopy unit

Authors

  • Deborah Dobree-Carey RGN,

    1. Deputy-Sister, Endoscopy Unit, Wycombe Hospital, Bucks, UK
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  • David A Gorard MD, FRCP

    Corresponding author
    1. Consultant Gastroenterologist, Endoscopy Unit, Wycombe Hospital, Bucks, UK
      David A Gorard, Wycombe Hospital, Queen Alexandra Road, High Wycombe, Bucks HP11 2TT, UK. Email: david.gorard@buckshosp.nhs.uk
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David A Gorard, Wycombe Hospital, Queen Alexandra Road, High Wycombe, Bucks HP11 2TT, UK. Email: david.gorard@buckshosp.nhs.uk

Abstract

Pre-procedural admission of outpatients to a day-case endoscopy facility is time-consuming. Collecting and recording routine but necessary information distracts nurses from spending time that could be used to counsel patients. This study assessed whether patients can record some pre-procedural details and whether such self-recording quickens nurse admission times. A new admission document was devised and posted to patients. Patients completed personal/administrative details and information about drugs and allergies and brought the document with them when attending for outpatient endoscopy. Endoscopy nurses anonymously timed 100 admissions, 50 using the new admission form and 50 using the old admission form. Overall, the median (range) time to admit using the old form was 6 (3–15.5) min. Using the new form, the median time to admit was lower at 4 (0.5–10) min. No patient completing the new form reported any particular difficulties. An admission document that patients partially complete at home leads to a faster pre-procedural admission in the endoscopy unit. This allows more nursing time to discuss patients’ anxieties and answer patient queries, helps to prevent delays and facilitates increased capacity in the endoscopy unit.

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