Psychometric testing of a Norwegian version of the Premature Infant Pain Profile: An acute pain assessment tool. A clinical validation study

Authors

  • Bente Johanne Vederhus MSC RN,

    Corresponding author
    1. Student, Section of Nursing Science, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway
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  • Geir Egil Eide MSC,

    1. Statistician, Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital and Statistics, Section for Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway
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  • Gerd Karin Natvig RN PhD

    1. Associate Professor, Section of Nursing Science, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway
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Bente Johanne Vederhus, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Haukeland University Hospital, N-5021 Bergen, Norway. Email: bente.vederhus@helse-bergen.no

Abstract

As neonates are submitted to pain, assessing the pain is crucial in effective pain control. The Premature Infant Pain Profile, an acute measurement tool combining physiological, behavioural and contextual indicators, was translated into Norwegian and tested clinically. The purpose was to establish construct validity, interrater reliability and internal consistency. In addition, the effect of sucrose as pain analgesia was tested in neonates ≥ 36 weeks of gestational age. In a known-groups comparisons design with repeated measures, 111 consecutive neonates, preterm and term, were all observed at baseline, non-pain and pain event. Neonates in the neonatal unit received sucrose at pain event. A significant interaction effect of gestational age and events was found in the sucrose neonates. A significant interaction effect was detected from sucrose and event type for neonates from 36 weeks. The internal consistency of the six-item score was acceptable. A correlation coefficient of 0.89–0.97 was obtained for interrater reliability. The Norwegian version of the Premature Infant Pain Profile seems to be a reliable and valid instrument for pain assessment in neonates.

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