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Taming the rescuer: The therapeutic nature of qualitative research interviews

Authors

  • Vicki Drury RN RMHN MCl.Nsg PGCertMH BEd BHlthSc(Nsg) MRCNA MANZCMHN,

    Corresponding author
    1. Doctoral Candidate, Monash University, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Gippsland, Churchill, Victoria, Australia
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  • Karen Francis RN PhD MHlthScNsg MEd BHlthScNsg DipHlthScNsg GradCertUniTeach/Learn MRCNA FAARN,

    1. Professor of Rural Nursing, Monash University, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Gippsland, Churchill, Victoria, Australia
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  • Ysanne Chapman RN PhD MSc(Hons) BEd(Nsg) GDE DNE DRM MRCNA

    1. Associate Professor of Nursing, Monash University, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Gippsland, Churchill, Victoria, Australia
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Vicki Drury, Monash University, School of Nursing, Gippsland Campus, Northways Road, Churchill, Vic. 3842, Australia. Email: v.drury@murdoch.edu.au

Abstract

Interviewing in qualitative research allows, indeed encourages, participants to tell their story. Although the researcher might want to hear a certain part of the story, it is not unusual for participants from vulnerable populations to tell the researcher their entire story. This paper explores the dilemmas faced by a researcher when interviewing in a non-sensitive area and explicates the ethical decision-making that occurred during the interviews to prevent blurring of boundaries.

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