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Self-management in older patients with chronic illness

Authors

  • Robyn Gallagher,

    Corresponding author
    1. Associate Professor, Chronic and Complex Care, Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Health, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
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  • Judith Donoghue,

    1. Adjunct Professor, Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Health, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
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  • Lynn Chenoweth,

    1. Professor of Aged and Extended Care Nursing, Director, Health and Ageing Research Unit, South-Eastern Sydney and Illawarra Area Health Service, and Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Health, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
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  • Jane Stein-Parbury

    1. Professor of Mental Health Nursing, Mental Health Nursing Professorial Unit, South-Eastern Sydney and Illawarra Area Health Service, Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Health, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
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Robyn Gallagher, Chronic and Complex Care, Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Health, University of Technology, Sydney, PO Box 123 Broadway, NSW, Australia. Email: Robyn.Gallagher@uts.edu.au

Abstract

Chronic illness causes the majority of disease burden and health costs in developed countries; however, this could be substantially reduced by optimal patient self-management. This study examined the levels of self-management in patients (n = 300) with chronic illness (chronic heart failure, chronic respiratory disease, Parkinson's disease and chronic schizophrenia) of moderate severity who had experienced an illness exacerbation in the last month. Patient's perceptions of self-efficacy in relation to their self-management and their sense of coherence were also assessed at baseline and 1 month later. No changes occurred in self-perceptions or self-management from baseline to follow-up. Patients at risk of poor self-management included people with low self-efficacy, poor sense of coherence, older age and a primary diagnosis of chronic schizophrenia. As self-efficacy is the only predictor known to be amenable to intervention, self-efficacy enhancing support should be promoted.

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