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How nurses address the burden of disease in remote or isolated areas in Queensland

Authors

  • Mohammad Al-Motlaq PhD-candidate MBS RN BSN,

    Corresponding author
    1. Research Assistant, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Gippsland Campus, Churchill, Victoria, Australia
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  • Jane Mills PhD RN BN MN GradCert (Tertiary Teaching) MRCNA,

    1. Senior Research Fellow, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Gippsland Campus, Churchill, Victoria, Australia
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  • Melanie Birks PhD RN BN MEd,

    1. Senior Lecturer, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Gippsland Campus, Churchill, Victoria, Australia
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  • Karen Francis RN PhD MEd MHlthScPHC GradCertUniTeach/Learn BHlthScNsg DipHlthScNsg FRCN FellowJBI

    1. Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Gippsland Campus, Churchill, Victoria, Australia
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Mohammad Al-Motlaq, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Gippsland Campus, Northways Road, Churchill, Vic. 3842, Australia. Email: mohammad.al-motlaq@med.monash.edu.au

Abstract

Al-Motlaq M, Mills J, Birks M, Francis K. International Journal of Nursing Practice 2010; 16: 472–477
How nurses address the burden of disease in remote or isolated areas in Queensland

Nurses have a role in addressing the burden of disease in remote or isolated areas of Queensland. Activities to prevent chronic and acute disease and injury, while promoting a health lifestyle, are a part of nurses' work that help to meet the goal of keeping a population healthy. The findings presented in this paper, as part of a broader study into the role of nurses working in remote or isolated areas of Queensland, describe how registered nurse in these locations address local burden of disease. Participants discussed the increased workload that engaging in health promotion and disease prevention activities creates for them when providing health-care services for their communities. Establishing stronger working relationships with visiting members of the primary health-care team, while addressing organizational barriers, might have a significant impact on the nurses' ability to help reduce the burden of disease in these areas.

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