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The effect of music on discomfort experienced by intensive care unit patients during turning: A randomized cross-over study

Authors

  • Marie Cooke RN MSPD PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Associate Professor, Research Centre for Clinical and Community Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
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  • Wendy Chaboyer RN MN PhD,

    1. Professor, Director, Research Centre for Clinical and Community Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
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  • Philip Schluter BSc MSc PhD,

    1. Professor, Head of Research, School of Public Health and Psychosocial Studies, AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand
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  • Michelle Foster RN BN MN,

    1. Critical Care, Intensive Care Unit, Gold Coast Hospital, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
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  • Denise Harris RN BN MN,

    1. Research, Assistant Director of Nursing, Division of Medicine & Critical Care, The Tweed Hospital, Tweed Heads, New South Wales, Australia
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  • Roz Teakle RN BN MScM

    1. Pain Management, Intensive Care Unit, The Tweed Hospital, Tweed Heads, New South Wales, Australia
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Marie Cooke, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Nathan campus, Griffith University, Nathan, Qld 4111, Australia. Email: m.cooke@griffith.edu.au

Abstract

Cooke M, Chaboyer W, Schluter P, Foster M, Harris D, Teakle R. International Journal of Nursing Practice 2010; 16: 125–131
The effect of music on discomfort experienced by intensive care unit patients during turning: A randomized cross-over study

Research consistently demonstrates that intensive care unit (ICU) patients experience pain, discomfort and anxiety despite analgesic and sedative use. The most painful procedure reported by critically ill patients is being turned. Music diminishes anxiety and discomfort in some populations; however, its effect on critically ill patients remains unknown. This research aimed to identify the effect of music on discomfort experienced by ICU patients during turning using a single blind randomized cross-over design. Seventeen post-operative ICU patients were recruited and treatment order randomized. Discomfort and anxiety were measured 15 min before and immediately after two turning procedures. Findings indicated that listening to music 15 min before and during turning did not significantly reduce discomfort or anxiety. Pain management might effectively be addressing discomfort and anxiety experienced during turning. Given previous studies have identified turning as painful, current results are promising and it might be useful to determine if this is widespread.

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