A shared care model vs. a patient allocation model of nursing care delivery: Comparing nursing staff satisfaction and stress outcomes

Authors

  • Duong T Tran B.Med (Vietnam) MIPH PhD Candidate,

    Corresponding author
    1. Research Officer, Centre for Applied Nursing Research, Sydney South West Area Health Service, Liverpool BC, and PhD Candidate, College of Health & Science, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
      Duong Tran, Centre for Applied Nursing Research, Liverpool Hospital, Locked Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871, Australia. Email: d.tran@uws.edu.au or danielle.tran@sswahs.nsw.gov.au
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  • Maree Johnson RN BAppSci MAppSci PhD,

    1. Acting Director Centre for Applied Nursing Research, Sydney South West Area Health Service, Liverpool BC, and Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing & Midwifery, College of Health & Science, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
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  • Ritin Fernandez RN MN (Critical Care) PhD,

    1. Senior Lecturer, School of Nursing & Midwifery, College of Health & Science, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
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  • Sonya Jones RN BAppSci BA GradDip HSM

    1. Senior Nurse Manager, Concord Repatriation General Hospital, Concord, New South Wales, Australia
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Duong Tran, Centre for Applied Nursing Research, Liverpool Hospital, Locked Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871, Australia. Email: d.tran@uws.edu.au or danielle.tran@sswahs.nsw.gov.au

Abstract

Tran DT, Johnson M, Fernandez R, Jones S. International Journal of Nursing Practice 2010; 16: 148–158
A shared care model vs. a patient allocation model of nursing care delivery: Comparing nursing staff satisfaction and stress outcomes

This study compared nurse outcomes between the shared care in nursing (SCN) and patient allocation (PA) models of care. A quasi-experimental design was used. Job satisfaction, stress and aspects of role were measured at baseline and 6 months after the implementation of the SCN model using validated instruments. Nurses in the PA (n = 51) and SCN (n = 74) units were comparable at baseline. Nurses from both groups were satisfied with their job and experienced clarity in their role despite some levels of pressure. ‘Satisfaction with co-workers’ in the SCN group decreased, emphasizing the challenges of supervising staff. Matched pair sample sizes at follow-up were small. The SCN represents an innovative model of care delivery that is responsive to increasing proportions of enrolled nurses and assistants in nursing within wards. Both models have been found to be supportive of nursing staff. Although difficulties with follow-up data were experienced, this study represents the first Australian quasi-experimental research, comparing two models with validated measures. New tasks such as negotiating with co-workers might create some new challenges for nurses. Hospital administrators should consider the repertoire of care delivery models available.

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