Education outcomes related to including genomics activities in nursing practice in Singapore

Authors

  • Elizabeth Pestka MS RN CNS APNG,

    Corresponding author
    1. Assistant Professor of Nursing, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic; and Clinical Nurse Specialist, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA
      Elizabeth Pestka, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. Email: pestka.elizabeth@mayo.edu
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  • Swee Hia Lim MS RN,

    1. Adjunct Associate Professor, Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, National University of Singapore; Group Director, Nursing, Singapore Health Services Pte Ltd; Director, Nursing, Singapore General Hospital; Director, Nursing, National Heart Centre Singapore, Singapore; and Adjunct Associate Professor, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
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  • Hong Hock Png PhD RN

    1. Deputy Director, Nursing, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore
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Elizabeth Pestka, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. Email: pestka.elizabeth@mayo.edu

Abstract

Pestka E, Lim SH, Png HH. International Journal of Nursing Practice 2010; 16: 282–288
Education outcomes related to including genomics activities in nursing practice in Singapore

The purpose of this study was to describe the impact of a genomic educational intervention by measuring the extent participants could apply the class content to practice. A sample of 76 nurses employed by Singapore Health Services, Singapore, participated in a nursing genomics seminar in 2008 and completed a survey form with a response rate of 89%. Every respondent was able to identify use of a genomic assessment or intervention item with a patient from their clinical practice. The mean use of genomic assessment and intervention items was 5.8 out of a possible 10. The most frequently used items were assessment of family history information, environmental factors and genomic physical findings. Findings provide evidence that nurses are able to include genomic assessments and interventions in their practice following targeted education. This study highlights how informed nurses are able to apply genomic assessments and interventions to individualize patient care.

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