Behaviour-change interventions in primary care: Influence on nutrition and on the metabolic syndrome definers

Authors

  • Hanna Kuninkaanniemi MSc,

    Corresponding author
    1. Researcher, Research Centre for Health Promotion, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland
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  • Jari Villberg MSc,

    1. Researcher, Research Centre for Health Promotion, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland
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  • Mauno Vanhala MD,

    1. Professor, Central Finland Central Hospital, Jyväskylä, Finland
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  • Marita Poskiparta PhD

    1. Professor, Research Centre for Health Promotion, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland
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Hanna Kuninkaanniemi, Research Centre for Health Promotion, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, PO Box 35, FIN-40014 Jyväskylä, Finland. Email: hanna.kuninkaanniemi@mamk.fi

Abstract

Kuninkaanniemi H, Villberg J, Vanhala M, Poskiparta M. International Journal of Nursing Practice 2011; 17: 470–477

Behaviour-change interventions in primary care: Influence on nutrition and on the metabolic syndrome definers

The purpose of this paper was to examine whether interventions influenced patients' (i) consumption of fish; whole grain products; fruits and vegetables; (ii) overall nutrition, that is, the three former as an index; and (iii) clinical outcomes in terms of metabolic syndrome definers. A questionnaire was delivered to adult patients entering the nine health centres on November 2006 (n = 1211). During the year the ward personnel conducted intervention on patients with unhealthy habits. The 12-month follow up was conducted by mailings. Also clinical data of pre- and post-intervention values of metabolic syndrome definers were collected. For the analyses, intervention was divided into brief (≤ 15 min, at most three visits) and extended (> 15 min, more than three visits) intervention. Logistic Regression and manova were used to measure changes in the outcomes. Nutrition-related intervention was conducted on 218 patients (brief intervention n = 179, extended intervention n = 39). In the extended intervention group it was three times more likely to have a positive change in the nutrition index than in the brief intervention group (P = 0.017, confidence interval 1.223–7.773). In conclusion, brief interventions were commonly used in the primary care. However, they were not enough to produce changes in the patients' nutrition or in the clinical outcomes.

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